To Kill a Mockingbird

By Harper Lee
(Harper Perennial Modern Classics, Paperback, 9780061120084, 336pp.)

Publication Date: June 2006

Other Editions of This Title: Hardcover, Mass Market Paperback

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Description

Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning masterwork of honor and injustice in the deep South -- and the heroism of one man in the face of blind and violent hatred

One of the best-loved stories of all time, To Kill a Mockingbird has been translated into more than forty languages, sold more than thirty million copies worldwide, served as the basis of an enormously popular motion picture, and was voted one of the best novels of the twentieth century by librarians across the country. A gripping, heart-wrenching, and wholly remarkable tale of coming-of-age in a South poisoned by virulent prejudice, it views a world of great beauty and savage inequities through the eyes of a young girl, as her father -- a crusading local lawyer -- risks everything to defend a black man unjustly accused of a terrible crime.




About the Author

Harper Lee was born in 1926 in Monroeville, Alabama. She attended Huntington College and studied law at the University of Alabama. She has been awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Pulitzer Prize, and many other accolades.




NPR
Monday, Jul 12, 2010

In her weekly commentary, host Michel Martin commemorates the 50th anniversary of the literary classic To Kill a Mockingbird by reflecting on her read of the novel as a child. More at NPR.org

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NPR
Sunday, Jul 11, 2010

On the 50th anniversary of the publication of To Kill A Mockingbird, Weekend Edition essayist Diane Roberts pays tribute to a character who is one of her heroes. More at NPR.org

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NPR
Sunday, Jul 11, 2010

Though Harper Lee has always said her book, To Kill a Mockingbird, and its setting are fictional, that won't stop thousands from visiting her hometown of Monroeville, Ala., for the novel's 50th anniversary. It's welcome attention for a town struggling through the recession. More at NPR.org

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NPR
Saturday, Jul 10, 2010

To mark the 50th anniversary of Harper Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird," host Scott Simon speaks with author James McBride about how the classic American novel influenced his life and writing career. McBride is the author of the memoir "The Color of Water," and the novel "Miracle at St. Anna," which was adapted into a film directed by Spike Lee. More at NPR.org

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NPR
Wednesday, Jul 7, 2010

When it was published in 1960, Harper Lee's modest novel helped Americans think differently about race. Now, 50 years later, To Kill a Mockingbird still resonates in a much-changed America. NPR's Lynn Neary examines the lasting impact of Scout Finch and her father, Atticus -- a lawyer who defends a black man unjustly accused of rape. More at NPR.org

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Conversation Starters from ReadingGroupChoices.com

CONVERSATION STARTERS

  1. How do Scout, Jem, and Dill characterize Boo Radley at the beginning of the book? In what way did Boo's past history of violence foreshadow his method of protecting Jem and Scout from Bob Ewell? Does this repetition of aggression make him more or less of a sympathetic character?

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