The Doll

The Doll

The Lost Short Stories

By Daphne du Maurier

Harper Paperbacks, Paperback, 9780062080349, 209pp.

Publication Date: November 22, 2011

Description

The lost stories of Daphne du Maurier, collected in one volume for the first time.

Before she wrote Rebecca, the novel that would cement her reputation as a twentieth-century literary giant, a young Daphne du Maurier penned short fiction in which she explored the images, themes, and concerns that informed her later work. Originally published in periodicals during the early 1930s, many of these stories never found their way into print again . . . until now.

Tales of human frailty and obsession, and of romance gone tragically awry, the thirteen stories in The Doll showcase an exciting budding talent before she went on to write one of the most beloved novels of all time. In these pages, a waterlogged notebook washes ashore revealing a dark story of jealousy and obsession, a vicar coaches a young couple divided by class issues, and an older man falls perilously in love with a much younger womanwith each tale demonstrating du Mauriers extraordinary storytelling gifts and her deep understanding of human nature.



About the Author
Daphne du Maurier (1907--1989), a novelist, playwright, biographer, and short-story writer, was born into an artistic family in London. She began writing short stories and articles in 1928 and in 1931 her first novel, "The Loving Spirit," was published. Many of her works were adapted into films, including "Rebecca,"" ""The Birds," and "Don't Look Now." In June 1969, du Maurier was named a Dame of the British Empire.
Patrick McGrath was born in London in 1950. His works include "Blood and Water and Other Tales," "The Grotesque," "Spider," "Dr. Haggard's Disease," "Asylum" (which was short-listed for the 1996 "Guardian" Fiction Prize and made into a feature film), "Martha Peake," and "Port Mungo," His most recent novel is "Trauma" (April 2008). He lives in London and New York with his wife, Maria Aitken.


Praise For The Doll

“This collection of early stories, some originally published in a now out-of-print volume, vividly portrays with humor, candidness, and detail du Maurier’s fascination with the problems of human connection, particularly when it comes to love.”
-Publishers Weekly

“…delectably florid….”
-New York Times Book Review