The Name of the Rose

The Name of the Rose

By Umberto Eco; William Weaver (Translator)

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt P, Paperback, 9780156001311, 552pp.

Publication Date: September 1994


“A brilliantly conceived adventure into another time” (San Francisco Chronicle) by critically acclaimed author Umberto Eco.


The year is 1327. Franciscans in a wealthy Italian abbey are suspected of heresy, and Brother William of Baskerville arrives to investigate. When his delicate mission is suddenly overshadowed by seven bizarre deaths, Brother William turns to the logic of Aristotle, the theology of Aquinas, and the empirical insights of Roger Bacon to find the killer. He collects evidence, deciphers secret symbols and coded manuscripts, and digs into the eerie labyrinth of the abbey (“where the most interesting things happen at night”) armed with a wry sense of humor and a ferocious curiosity.

About the Author
Umberto Eco was born in 1932 in Alessandria, Italy. He is a professor of semiotics at the University of Bologna, a philosopher, historian, literary critic and aesthetician. He is the author of the international bestselling novels "The Name of the Rose" and "The Island of the Day Before", as well as three collections of popular essays, "Travels in Hyperreality, Misreadings "and "How to Travel with a Salmon & Other Essays". Mr. Eco lives in Milan.

After leaving Princeton in his sophmore year to join the American Field Service, William Weaver drove an ambulance with the British army, first in Africa and then in Italy, initiating his long fascination with that country. After finally graduating from Princeton in 1946, he then returned to Italy, translating many of the most important modern Italians, from Pirandello to Morante, Gadda, Calvino, and Umberto Eco. His translations have received the National Book Award, the Galantiere Prize, the PEN translation prize twice, and the John Florio Prize 3 times. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and teaches at Bard College.