The Duke's Children

By Anthony Trollope, Ed; Katherine Mullin (Editor); Francis O'Gorman (Editor)
(Oxford University Press, USA, Paperback, 9780199578382, 542pp.)

Publication Date: October 2011

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Description
A fitting conclusion to the Palliser novels, one of the most remarkable achievements in British fiction, The Duke's Children is a touching story of love, family relationships, loyalty, and principles, following the aging Duke of Omnium as he struggles to come to terms with the loss of his vivacious wife, Lady Glencora, and the willfulness of his three children. The wide-ranging introduction explores the implicit politics of the novel about the nature of conservatism and liberalism in all their facets; the "woman question"; autobiographical echoes; gambling; and the novel's interest in modernity and the United States. The book also includes an invaluable appendix that outlines the political context of the Palliser novels and establishes the internal chronology of the series, providing a unique understanding of the six books as a linked narrative. The editors also provide explanatory notes, and the preface provides both a compact biography of Anthony Trollope and a Chronology charts his life against the major historical events of the period.
About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.



About the Author
Anthony Trollope was a Victorian-era English author best known for his satirical novel The Way We Live Now, a criticism of the greed and immorality he witnessed living in London. Trollope was employed as a postal surveyor in Ireland when he began to take up writing as a serious pursuit, publishing four novels on Irish subjects during his years there. In 1851 Trollope was travelling the English countryside for work when was inspired with the plot for The Warden, the first of six novels in what would become his famous The Chronicles of Barsetshire series. Trollope eventually settled in London and over the next thirty years published a prodigious body of work, including Barsetshire novels such as Barchester Towers and Doctor Thorne, as well as numerous other novels and short stories. Trollope died in London 1882 at the age of 67.

Katharine Mullin is Research Fellow at Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge. Her work has appeared in Semicolonial Joyce ed. Derek Attridge and Marjorie Howes (Cambridge, 2000) and in Modernism/ Modernity.

Francis O'Gorman is from English, Irish, and Hungarian families and was educated at the University of Oxford as Organ Scholar of Lady Margaret Hall. He has written or edited twenty books, mostly on English literature, and his many essays discuss literature, mental health, music, and the state of the modern university. His most recent piece of creative non-fiction is a memoir, "Forgetfulness "(2016). He is a Professor in the School of English at the University of Leeds, UK.
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