Angel Island

Immigrant Gateway to America

By Erika Lee; Judy Yung
(Oxford University Press, USA, Hardcover, 9780199734085, 394pp.)

Publication Date: August 2010

Shop Local
Enter your zip code below to find indies closest to you.

Go


Description
From 1910 to 1940, the Angel Island immigration station in San Francisco served as the processing and detention center for over one million people from around the world. The majority of newcomers came from China and Japan, but there were also immigrants from India, the Philippines, Korea, Russia, Mexico, and over seventy other countries. The full history of these immigrants and their experiences on Angel Island is told for the first time in this landmark book, published to commemorate the immigration station's 100th anniversary.
Based on extensive new research and oral histories, Angel Island: Immigrant Gateway to America examines the great diversity of immigration through Angel Island: Chinese "paper sons," Japanese picture brides, Korean refugee students, South Asian political activists, Russian and Jewish refugees, Mexican families, Filipino workers, and many others. Together, their stories offer a more complete and complicated history of immigration to America than we have ever known.
Like its counterpart on Ellis Island, the immigration station on Angel Island was one of the country's main ports of entry for immigrants in the early twentieth century. But while Ellis Island was mainly a processing center for European immigrants, Angel Island was designed to detain and exclude immigrants from Asia. The immigrant experience on Angel Island-more than any other site-reveals how U.S. immigration policies and their hierarchical treatment of immigrants according to race, ethnicity, class, nationality, and gender played out in daily practices and decisions at the nation's borders with real consequences on immigrant lives and on the country itself.
Angel Island: Immigrant Gateway to America is officially sponsored by the Angel Island Immigration Station.



About the Author
Erika Lee is the granddaughter of Chinese immigrants who entered the United States through both Angel Island and Ellis Island. She grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area and received her PhD from the University of California at Berkeley. She teaches history at the University of Minnesota, where she is also the Rudolph J. Vecoli Chair in Immigration History and Director of the Immigration History Research Center.

Judy Yung, Professor Emerita of American Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz, is author of the award-winning "Unbound Feet: A Social History of Chinese Women in San Francisco" (California, 1995) among other books. Gordon H. Chang, Professor of History at Stanford University, is editor of "Asian Americans and Politics: Perspectives, Experiences, Prospects (2001)"and author of other books. Him Mark Lai, Adjunct Professor of Asian American Studies at San Francisco State University, is author of "Becoming Chinese American: A History of Communities and Institutions "(2004), and other books.


NPR
Wednesday, Oct 6, 2010

Thousands of immigrants passed through California's Angel Island before entering the U.S. during the early 1900s -- and few received a warm welcome. Historian Judy Yung shares her father's journey through the island and discusses her book, Angel Island: Immigrant Gateway to America. More at NPR.org

NPR Audio Player Requires Flash Upgrade: Please upgrade your plug-in to view this content.

Indie Bookstore Finder
EBbooks and EReaders
Find great gifts: Signed books
Link to IndieBound






Update Profile