The Miracle at Speedy Motors

By Alexander McCall Smith
(Anchor Books, Paperback, 9780307277466, 214pp.)

Publication Date: March 10, 2009

List Price: $14.95*
* Individual store prices may vary.
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Description

THE NO. 1 LADIES' DETECTIVE AGENCY - Book 9
Fans around the world adore the bestselling No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency series, the basis of the HBO TV show, and its proprietor Precious Ramotswe, Botswana's premier lady detective. In this charming series, Mma Ramotswe navigates her cases and her personal life with wisdom, and good humor--not to mention help from her loyal assistant, Grace Makutsi, and the occasional cup of tea.

Under the endless skies of Botswana, there is always something Mma Ramotswe can do to help someone and here she finds herself assisting a woman looking for her family. The problem is the woman doesn't know her real name or whether any of her family members are still alive. Meanwhile, Mma Makutsi is the recipient of a beautiful new bed that causes more than a few sleepless nights. And, at Tlokweng Road Speedy Motors, Mr. J.L.B. Matekoni has come under the influence of a doctor promising a miracle cure for his daughter's medical condition, which Mma Ramotswe finds hard to accept. Nonetheless, Precious Ramotswe handles these things in her usual compassionate and good-natured way, while always finding time for a cup of red bush tea.

www.alexandermccallsmith.com.




About the Author
Alexander McCall Smith is best known for The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency series, beloved New York Times and international best sellers. A practicing professor of medical law and the author of over fifty books, ranging from children's fiction to folktales to The Criminal Law of Botswana, he lives in Edinburgh.


Conversation Starters from ReadingGroupChoices.com

CONVERSATION STARTERS

  1. After Mma Makutsi protests about the agency's address being "in care of" Tlokweng Road Speedy Motors, Mma Ramotswe thinks about the meanings of the phrase. "Yes, we were all care of one another in the final analysis, at least in Botswana, where people looked for and valued those invisible links that connected people, that made for belonging". Would you consider this idea central to the book? To which characters or events in the story does this phrase "in care of" seem most pertinent?

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