Owney, the Mail-Pouch Pooch

Owney, the Mail-Pouch Pooch Cover

Owney, the Mail-Pouch Pooch

By Mona Kerby; Lynne Barasch (Illustrator)

Farrar Straus Giroux, Hardcover, 9780374356859, 40pp.

Publication Date: April 29, 2008


One rainy night in 1888, a stray dog wandered into the U.S. Post Office in Albany, New York. Workers found him the next morning asleep on a pile of mail pouches. The dog seemed to like the post office and the smell of the mailbags and the men's wool uniforms. When no one came to claim him, they named him Owney and made him their pet. However, Owney's loyalty and sense of adventure soon made it clear he wasn't just an average mutt. Over the course of nine years, Owney guarded the mail not only in Albany but on mail trains that traveled all over the United States.

Accompanied by lively pen-and-watercolor illustrations, this is a delightful true story of a special dog whose faithful service earned him a trip around the world. Owney can be seen in the Smithsonian's National Postal Museum.
"Owney, the Mail-Pouch Pooch" is a 2009 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.

About the Author
MONA KERBY has written many acclaimed books for children. She lives in Westminster, Maryland. LYNNE BARASCH is the author/illustrator of several picture books, including "Radio Rescue," an ALA Notable Book. She lives in New York City.

Praise For Owney, the Mail-Pouch Pooch

“Barasch’s watercolors bring this historical dog to endearing life.” —Miami Herald   
"Readers will be captivated by Owney's journey from hungry and homeless to beloved guardian of the mail trains... sure to develop a loyal following among lovers of dog stories." Starred, School Library Journal "Ever alert and increasingly covered in tags attached at his many stopovers, this small dog makes an engaging centerpiece." —Kirkus Reviews "Kudos to Kerby who...did plenty of research for this kid-friendly history. . . . The Ink-and-watercolor paintings, ranging from two-page spreads to vignettes, are varied and interesting." —Booklist "Watercolor-and-ink sketches warmly illustrate the mixed-breed terrier and showcase the varied architectural styles that housed post offices around the country." —Horn Book "This is a versatile little doggy number: it could also serve as a readaloud . . . or it could serve as an offbeat springboard to explorations of travel or even the postal system." —Bulletin for the Center of Children's Books