Why Mole Shouted and Other Stories

Why Mole Shouted and Other Stories

By Lore Segal; Sergio Ruzzier (Illustrator)

Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR), Hardcover, 9780374384173, 40pp.

Publication Date: April 1, 2004

Description

What's a Mole to do?

Once there was a Mole who lived with his Grandmother Mole in a hole in the forest, and most of the time they get on well enough . . .

But see what happens when Mole loses his glasses, doesn't zip his jacket, shouts, and keeps asking why. What is a Grandmother Mole to do except love him and kiss him on his nose?

Four winning stories combined with Sergio Ruzzier's simple, hilarious illustrations convey the tender bond between a grandmother and her grandson.



About the Author

Lore Segal is the author of numerous books for young readers, including Morris the Artist. She lives in New York City.

Sergio Ruzzier's illustrations regularly appear in The New Yorker, among other publications. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.





Praise For Why Mole Shouted and Other Stories

"Funny, tender...perfect for the lap-sit crowd...Reminiscent of Arnold Lobel's Frog and Toad." -- Booklist

"Segal again proves she's in tune with a child's mindset...this book works to entertain all levels." -- Publishers Weekly

"Appealing...Segal captures the caprice and occasionally challenging nature of young children." -- School Library Journal

"Familial and affectionate...begging for a snug readaloud." -- The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

"It's just the two of them, Mole and Grandmother Mole, living in an oddly roomy but pleasantly furnished hole in the forest. Mole is absentminded, likes to stand on his head and sleeps in an ungodly mess of a bedroom. Grandmother Mole is stooped and weary but sweetly attentive to her goofy grandchild. They love each other, this nearsighted, bickering pair. And in 'Why Mole Shouted,' written by Lore Segal and illustrated by Sergio Ruzzier, the miniscule dramas of their life together form the core of a sly, solemn, slightly silly and utterly charming book...Animal children in picture books can be wretched facsimiles like the Berenstain Bears, or miracles of invention like Frances the badger, as real as any little girl you will ever meet. That skinny spot next to hers on the bookshelf would be perfect for young Mole." -- The New York Times Book Review