Papa's Mechanical Fish

Papa's Mechanical Fish

By Candace Fleming; Boris Kulikov (Illustrator)

Farrar Straus Giroux, Hardcover, 9780374399085, 40pp.

Publication Date: June 4, 2013

Description

"Clink Clankety-bang Thump-whirr "That's the sound of Papa at work. Although he is an inventor, he has never made anything that works perfectly, and that's because he hasn't yet found a truly fantastic idea. But when he takes his family fishing on Lake Michigan, his daughter Virena asks, "Have you ever wondered what it's like to be a fish?" and Papa is off to his workshop. With a lot of persistence and a little bit of help, Papa who is based on the real-life inventor Lodner Phillips creates a submarine that can take his family for a trip to the bottom of Lake Michigan.



About the Author
I have always been a storyteller. Even before I could write my name, I could tell a good tale. And I told them all the time. As a preschooler, I told my neighbors all about my three-legged cat named Spot. In kindergarten, I told my classmates about the ghost that lived in my attic. And in first grade, I told my teacher, Miss Harbart, all about my family s trip to Paris, France.

I told such a good story that people always thought I was telling the truth. But I wasn t. I didn t have a three-legged cat or a ghost in my attic, and I d certainly never been to Paris, France. I simply enjoyed telling a good story . . . and seeing my listener s reaction.

Sure, some people might have said I was a seven-year-old fibber. But not my parents. Instead of calling my stories "fibs" they called them "imaginative." They encouraged me to put my stories down on paper. I did. And amazingly, once I began writing, I couldn t stop. I filled notebook after notebook with stories, poems, plays. I still have many of those notebooks. They re precious to me because they are a record of my writing life from elementary school on.

In second grade, I discovered a passion for language. I can still remember the day my teacher, Ms. Johnson, held up a horn-shaped basket filled with papier-mache pumpkins and asked the class to repeat the word "cornucopia." I said it again and again. I tasted the word on my lips. I tested it on my ears. That afternoon, I skipped all the way home from school chanting "Cornucopia! Cornucopia!" From then on, I really began listening to words -- to the sounds they made, and the way they were used, and how they made me feel. I longed to put them together in ways that were beautiful and yet told a story.

As I grew, I continued to write stories. But I never really thought of becoming an author. Instead, I went to college, where I discovered yet another passion -- history. I didn t realize it then, but studying history was really just an extension of my love of stories. After all, some of the best stories are true ones -- tales of heroism and villainy made more incredible by the fact they really happened.

After graduation, I got married and had children. I read to them a lot, and that s when I discovered the joy and music of children s books. I simply couldn t get enough of them. With my two sons in tow, I made endless trips to the library. I read stacks of books. I found myself begging, "Just one more, pleeeease!" while my boys begged for lights-out and sleep. Then it struck me. Why not write children s books? It seemed the perfect way to combine all the things I loved -- stories, musical language, history, and reading. I couldn t wait to get started.

But writing children s books is harder than it sounds. For three years, I wrote story after story. I sent them to publisher after publisher. And I received rejection letter after rejection letter. Still, I didn t give up. I kept trying until finally one of my stories was pulled from the slush pile and turned into a book. My career as a children s author had begun.

Candace Fleming lives in Mount Prospect, Illinois.



Boris Kulikov illustrated "Morris the Artist" by Lore Segal. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.


Praise For Papa's Mechanical Fish

"Fleming’s telling is lively, humorous, and specific." -- The Horn Book  

"A humorous tribute to the zany, determined and innovative side of invention." -- Kirkus Reviews

"There’s a rich history of batty inventor/tinkerer dads in children’s books, and the girl narrator’s father in this book could hang with the best of them." -- Booklist

 *"The exuberant and inquisitive tone of this book is sure to entertain curious children." -- School Library Journal, starred review