Forever Free

Forever Free Cover

Forever Free

The Story of Emancipation and Reconstruction

By Eric Foner; Joshua Brown (Illustrator)

Vintage Books USA, Paperback, 9780375702747, 268pp.

Publication Date: November 14, 2006

Description

From one of our most distinguished historians comes a groundbreaking new examination of the myths and realities of the period after the Civil War.

Drawing on a wide range of long-neglected documents, Eric Foner places a new emphasis on black experiences and roles during the era. We see African Americans as active agents in overthrowing slavery, in shaping Reconstruction, and creating a legacy long obscured and misunderstood. He compellingly refutes long-standing misconceptions of Reconstruction, and shows how the failures of the time sowed the seeds of the Civil Rights struggles of the 1950s and 60s. Richly illustrated and movingly written, this is an illuminating and essential addition to our understanding of this momentous era.



About the Author
Eric Foner is DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University and the author of several books. In 2006 he received the Presidential Award for Outstanding Teaching at Columbia University. He has served as president of the Organization of American Historians, the American Historical Association, and the Society of American Historians. He lives in New York City.

Joshua Brown is Executive Director of the American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning at The Graduate Center, City University of New York. He is coauthor of the interactive CD-ROMs "Who Built America? From the Great War of 1914 to the Dawn of the Atomic Age "(2000) and "Who Built America? From the Centennial Celebration of 1876 to the Great War of 1914 "(1993), and visual editor of the groundbreaking "Who Built America? "textbook (1990, 2000), in addition to his many other documentaries, digital programs, essays, illustrations, and cartoons.


Praise For Forever Free

“A highly readable story of black Americans’ ongoing heroic struggle for freedom . . . Beautifully told.” –The Washington Post Book World“Passionate, lucid, concise without being light. . . . Foner traces the lines of race and politics that run from Reconstruction to the age of segregation to the civil rights movement to our own time.” –The New York Times Book Review“Foner delves deeply into the politics of the time, to be sure, but he spends much more time showing how political decisions affected real people. . . . This book has the potential to become a model for future history books that target a broader audience.” –The Washington Monthly“African Americans emerge as political powerful actors in Forever Free. In [these] vivid pages . . . we become acquainted with these extraordinary people, some well-known, some virtually unknown.” –The New Republic