Paris 1919

Paris 1919

Six Months That Changed the World

By Margaret MacMillan; Richard Holbrooke (Foreword by)

Random House Trade, Paperback, 9780375760525, 624pp.

Publication Date: September 9, 2003

National Bestseller
"New York Times" Editors Choice
Winner of the PEN Hessell Tiltman Prize
Winner of the Duff Cooper Prize
Silver Medalist for the Arthur Ross Book Award
of the Council on Foreign Relations
Finalist for the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award
For six months in 1919, after the end of the war to end all wars, the Big Three President Woodrow Wilson, British prime minister David Lloyd George, and French premier Georges Clemenceau met in Paris to shape a lasting peace. In this landmark work of narrative history, Margaret MacMillan gives a dramatic and intimate view of those fateful days, which saw new political entities Iraq, Yugoslavia, and Palestine, among them born out of the ruins of bankrupt empires, and the borders of the modern world redrawn.

About the Author
Margaret MacMillan is the Warden of St Antony s College and a professor of International History at the University of Oxford.

Richard Holbrooke is the former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.

Praise For Paris 1919

“The history of the 1919 Paris peace talks following World War I is a blueprint of the political and social upheavals bedeviling the planet now. . . . A wealth of colorful detail and a concentration on the strange characters many of these statesmen were keep [MacMillan’s] narrative lively.”
—The New York Times Book Review

“MacMillan’s book reminds us of the main lesson learned at such a high cost in Paris in 1919: Peace is not something that can be imposed at the conference table. It can grow only from the hearts of people.”
—Los Angeles Times

“Beautifully written, full of judgment and wisdom, Paris 1919 is a pleasure to read and vibrates with the passions of the early twentieth century and of ours.”
—San Francisco Chronicle

“MacMillan is a superb writer who can bring history to life.”
—The Philadelphia Inquirer

“For anyone interested in knowing how historic mistakes can morph into later historic problems, this brilliant book is a must-read.”
—Chicago Tribune