Toy Dance Party

Being the Further Adventures of a Bossyboots Stingray, a Courageous Buffalo, and a Hopeful Round Someone Called Plasti

By Emily Jenkins; Paul O. Zelinsky (Illustrator)
Yearling Books, Paperback, 9780375855252, 159pp.

Publication Date: May 11, 2010

List Price: $6.99*
* Individual store prices may vary.
Shop Local
Enter your zip code below to find indies closest to you.




Description
Here is the second book in the highly acclaimed Toys Trilogy, which includes the companion books "Toys Go Out" and "Toys Come Home."
Lumphy, Stingray, and Plastic are back And this time the lovable trio finds that their little girl has left for winter vacation and taken a box of dominoes, a stegosaurus puzzle, and two Barbie dolls but not them. Could she have forgotten them?
As the girl starts to grow up, the three best friends must join together to brave a blizzard, save the toy mice from the vacuum, and make sure that they ll always have the little girl's love. (And they still have time to throw an all-out dance party with the washing machine )

"From the Hardcover edition.




About the Author
I grew up in the Boston area in the 1970s. My mother was a preschool teacher and my father a playwright. I remember visiting my mother's classroom and reading to the children there; even more vividly, I remember sitting in the back row of theater after theater, watching rehearsals--seeing stories come to life. My mother read me countless picture books, but at my father's house there wasn't much of that nature. He read me what was at hand: "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland", "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn", Sherlock Holmes stories. He also made up stories for me and recounted the plots of Shakespeare's plays.I was a raw child. In fact, I am a raw adult. This is a hard quality to live with sometimes, but it is a useful quality if you want to be a writer. It is easy to hurt my feelings, and I am unable to watch the news or read about painful subjects without weeping. I was often called oversensitive when I was young, but I've learned to appreciate this quality in myself, and to use it in my writing.Growing up, I spent large parts of my life in imaginary worlds: Neverland, Oz, and Narnia, in particular. I read in the bath, at meals, in the car, you name it. Around the age of eight, I began working on my own writing. My early enterprises began with a seminal picture book featuring a heroic orange sleeping bag, followed by novel-length imitations of "The Wolves of Willoughby Chase" by Joan Aiken and" Pippi Longstocking" by Astrid Lindgren.I have never kept journals or notebooks for my own sake. I am a writer who writes always with the idea of an audience in mind--and at nine I was determined to share my Pippi story with the world. I got my father to type it up in a book format and photocopy it fifty times. Then he took me to an artist friend's studio, where we silkscreened fifty copies of a drawing I'd made for the cover. I gave it to everyone I knew. That was my first book.I have always been interested in picture books as a form, which stems (I suppose) from my background in theater. I am fascinated by the intersection of words and images-- the way the meanings of words can be altered by changing their presentation. An actor varies her intonation or an illustrator changes a line--and the story is new. In college, I studied illustrated books from an academic standpoint. I went to Vassar, where children's book writer Nancy Willard was on the faculty. She introduced me to illustrator Barry Moser, and the interview he gave me was the centerpiece of my senior thesis. While I was there, I spent three years as a student assistant in Vassar's lab pre-school, and after graduation found work as an assistant teacher in a Montessori school, teaching six- to nine-year-olds. That year, I began to write a novel with my father--through the mail. I was in Chicago and he was in New York. We thought it would be a fun way to keep in touch. I wrote a chapter--then he wrote a chapter. We rewrote each other's chapters. And rewrote them again. It took a long time, but eventually that story was published as "The Secret Life of Billie's Uncle Myron".Now I write full time (except when parenting) in a tiny little office in Brooklyn, accompanied by two plump and ancient cats. The walls are raspberry-colored and lined with pictures by the artists I've worked with.Emily Jenkins writes books for both adults and children. She has a doctorate in English literature from Columbia and reviews children's books for "The New York Times". At New York University, she teaches a course in writing for children.In a career spanning four decades, award-winning author Diana Wynne Jones (1934-2011) wrote more than forty books of fantasy for young readers. Characterized by magic, multiple universes, witches and wizards--and a charismatic nine-lived enchanter--her books were filled with unlimited imagination, dazzling plots, and an effervescent sense of humor that earned her legendary status in the world of fantasy. In addition to being translated into more than twenty languages, her books have earned a wide array of honors--including two "Boston Globe-Horn Book" Award Honors and the "Guardian" Award--and appeared on countless best-of-the-year lists. Her best-selling Howl's "Moving Castle" was made into an animated film by Japanese director Hayao Miyazaki and was nominated for an Academy Award. Diana Wynne Jones was also honored with many prestigious awards for the body of her work. She was given the British Fantasy Society's Karl Edward Wagner Award in 1999 for having made a significant impact on fantasy, and she won the Lifetime Achievement Award at the World Fantasy Convention in 2007.



Praise For Toy Dance Party

Starred Review, Kirkus Reviews, July 15, 2008:
"Poignant and compelling, this sequel sparkles."

Indie Bookstore Finder
EBbooks and EReaders
Find great gifts: Signed books
Link to IndieBound