Rebecca

By Daphne du Maurier
(William Morrow & Company, Paperback, 9780380730407, 416pp.)

Publication Date: September 2006

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Description

With these words, the reader is ushered into an isolated gray stone mansion on the windswept Cornish coast, as the second Mrs. Maxim de Winter recalls the chilling events that transpired as she began her new life as the young bride of a husband she barely knew. For in every corner of every room were phantoms of a time dead but not forgotten—a past devotedly preserved by the sinister housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers: a suite immaculate and untouched, clothing laid out and ready to be worn, but not by any of the great house's current occupants. With an eerie presentiment of evil tightening her heart, the second Mrs. de Winter walked in the shadow of her mysterious predecessor, determined to uncover the darkest secrets and shattering truths about Maxim's first wife—the late and hauntingly beautiful Rebecca.

This special edition of Rebecca includes excerpts from Daphne du Maurier's The Rebecca Notebook and Other Memories, an essay on the real Manderley, du Maurier's original epilogue to the book, and more.




About the Author
Daphne du Maurier (1907--1989), a novelist, playwright, biographer, and short-story writer, was born into an artistic family in London. She began writing short stories and articles in 1928 and in 1931 her first novel, "The Loving Spirit," was published. Many of her works were adapted into films, including "Rebecca,"" ""The Birds," and "Don't Look Now." In June 1969, du Maurier was named a Dame of the British Empire.
Patrick McGrath was born in London in 1950. His works include "Blood and Water and Other Tales," "The Grotesque," "Spider," "Dr. Haggard's Disease," "Asylum" (which was short-listed for the 1996 "Guardian" Fiction Prize and made into a feature film), "Martha Peake," and "Port Mungo," His most recent novel is "Trauma" (April 2008). He lives in London and New York with his wife, Maria Aitken.


NPR
Wednesday, Oct 28, 2009

Literature is full of reminders that houses have souls, a fact characters forget at their own peril. In some novels, the house is as much a force as any of the people in the story. When that happens, the human characters had better beware. More at NPR.org

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