A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man Cover

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

By James Joyce; Langdon Hammer (Introduction by)

Signet Classics, Mass Market Paperbound, 9780451530158, 256pp.

Publication Date: June 6, 2006

Description
A masterpiece of modern fiction, James Joyce's semiautobiographical first novel follows Stephen Dedalus, a sensitive and creative youth who rebels against his family, his education, and his country by committing himself to the artist's life.
I will not serve, vows Dedalus, that in which I no longer believe and I will try to express myself in some mode of life or art as freely as I can. Likening himself to God, Dedalus notes that the artist remains within or behind or beyond or above his handiwork, invisible, refined out of existence, indifferent, paring his fingernails. Joyce's rendering of the impressions of childhood broke ground in the use of language. He took on the almost infinite English language, Jorge Luis Borges said once. He wrote in a language invented by himself....Joyce brought a new music to English. A bold literary experiment, this classic has had a huge and lasting influence on the contemporary novel.
With an Introduction by Langdon Hammer.


About the Author
James Joyce, the twentieth century's most influential novelist, was born in Dublin on February 2, 1882. The oldest of ten children, he grew up in a family that went from prosperity to penury because of his father's wastrel behavior. After receiving a rigorous Jesuit education, twenty-year-old Joyce renounced his Catholicism and left Dublin in 1902 to spend most of his life as a writer in exile in Paris, Trieste, Rome, and Zurich. On one trip back to Ireland, he fell in love with the now famous Nora Barnacle on June 16, the day he later chose as "Bloomsday" in his novel "Ulysses. "Nara was an uneducated Galway girl who became his lifelong companion an the mother of his two children. In debt and drinking heavily, Joyce lived for thirty-six years on the Continent, supporting himself first by teaching jobs, then trough the patronage of Mrs. Harold McCormick (Edith Rockerfeller) and the English feminist and editor Harriet Shaw Weaver. His writings include "Chamber music "(1907), "Dubliners "(1914), "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man "(1916), "Exiles "(1918), "Ulysses "(1922), "Poems Penyeach "(1927), "Finnegans Wake "(1939), and an early draft of "A Portrait of a Young Man, Stephan Hero "(1944). "Ulysses "required seven years to complete, and his masterpiece, "Finnegans Wake, "took seventeen. Both works revolutionized the form, structure, and content of the novel. Joyce died in Zurich in 1941.



Praise For A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

“Joyce’s work is not about the thing—it is the thing itself.”—Samuel Beckett



“Admirable.”—Jorge Luis Borges



 



“Joyce’s work is not about the thing—it is the thing itself.”—Samuel Beckett
 
“Admirable.”—Jorge Luis Borges