Dubliners

Dubliners

By James Joyce; Malachy McCourt (Afterword by); Edna O'Brien (Introduction by)

Signet Classics, Mass Market Paperbound, 9780451530417, 250pp.

Publication Date: February 6, 2007

Description
Centennial Edition
Perhaps the greatest short story collection in the English language, James Joyce's "Dubliners "is both a vivid and unflinching portrait of dear dirty Dublin at the turn of the twentieth century and a moral history of a nation and a people whose golden age has passed. His richly drawn characters at once intensely Irish and utterly universal may forever haunt the reader. In mesmerizing writing that evokes rich imagery, Joyce delves into the heart of the city of his birth, capturing the cadences of Dubliners speech in remarkably realistic portrayals of their inner lives. This magnificent collection of fifteen stories reveals Joyce at his most accessible and perhaps most profound.
With an Introduction by Edna O Brien and an Afterword by Malachy McCourt


About the Author
James Joyce, the twentieth century's most influential novelist, was born in Dublin on February 2, 1882. The oldest of ten children, he grew up in a family that went from prosperity to penury because of his father's wastrel behavior. After receiving a rigorous Jesuit education, twenty-year-old Joyce renounced his Catholicism and left Dublin in 1902 to spend most of his life as a writer in exile in Paris, Trieste, Rome, and Zurich. On one trip back to Ireland, he fell in love with the now famous Nora Barnacle on June 16, the day he later chose as "Bloomsday" in his novel "Ulysses. "Nara was an uneducated Galway girl who became his lifelong companion an the mother of his two children. In debt and drinking heavily, Joyce lived for thirty-six years on the Continent, supporting himself first by teaching jobs, then trough the patronage of Mrs. Harold McCormick (Edith Rockerfeller) and the English feminist and editor Harriet Shaw Weaver. His writings include "Chamber music "(1907), "Dubliners "(1914), "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man "(1916), "Exiles "(1918), "Ulysses "(1922), "Poems Penyeach "(1927), "Finnegans Wake "(1939), and an early draft of "A Portrait of a Young Man, Stephan Hero "(1944). "Ulysses "required seven years to complete, and his masterpiece, "Finnegans Wake, "took seventeen. Both works revolutionized the form, structure, and content of the novel. Joyce died in Zurich in 1941.

Malachy McCourt, sixty-nine, is the father of five children, and the grandfather of three. He lives with his wife, Diana, in New York City.

EDNA O BRIEN is the author of eighteen works of fiction, including the New York Times Notable Books and Book Sense picks Wild Decembers and In the Forest, and Lantern Slides, which won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. In 2002 she won the National Medal for Fiction from the National Arts Club. An honorary member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, O Brien was born and grew up in Ireland and has lived in London for many years.


Praise For Dubliners

“A genuine storyteller with a unique personal vision.”—Frank O’Connor

“Joyce’s work is not about the thing—it is the thing itself.”—Samuel Beckett