Sleeping Freshmen Never Lie

Sleeping Freshmen Never Lie Cover

Sleeping Freshmen Never Lie

By David Lubar

Dutton Books, Hardcover, 9780525473114, 279pp.

Publication Date: July 21, 2005

Description
Starting high school is never easy. Seniors take your lunch money. Girls you ve known forever are suddenly beautiful and unattainable.The guys you grew up with are drifting away.And you can never get enough sleep. Could there be a worse time for Scott's mother to announce she's pregnant? Scott decides high school would be a lot less overwhelming if it came with a survival manual, so he begins to write down tips for his new sibling. Scott's chronicle of his first year of bullies, romance, honors classes, and brotherhood is both laugh-out-loud funny and touchingly wise.


About the Author
David Lubar created a sensation with his debut novel, "Hidden Talents", an ALA Best Book for Young Adults. Thousands of kids and educators across the country have voted "Hidden Talents" onto over twenty state lists. David is also the author of "True Talents", the sequel to "Hidden Talents"; "Flip", an ALA Best Book for Young Adults and a VOYA Best Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror selection; many short story collections including "In the Land of the Lawn Weenies, Invasion of the Road Weenies, The Curse of the Campfire Weenies, The Battle of the Red Hot Pepper Weenies, Attack of the Vampire Weenies, Beware the Ninja Weenies, Wipeout of the Wireless Weenies, Strikeout of the Bleacher Weenies, "and" Extremities"; and the Nathan Abercrombie, Accidental Zombie series. Lubar grew up in Morristown, New Jersey, and he has also lived in New Brunswick, Edison and Piscataway, NJ, and Sacramento, CA. Besides writing, he has also worked as a video game programmer and designer. He now lives in Nazareth, Pennsylvania.


Praise For Sleeping Freshmen Never Lie

"[A] solidly enjoyable read sprinkled with laughs, puzzles, a few groans, some oh-I-get-it nods, and generally good geeky fun throughout."

-Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, starred review