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Testing the Ice

Testing the Ice Cover

Testing the Ice

A True Story about Jackie Robinson

By Sharon Robinson; Kadir Nelson (Illustrator)

Scholastic Press, Hardcover, 9780545052511, 40pp.

Publication Date: October 1, 2009

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Description
Sharon Robinson, the daughter of baseball legend Jackie Robinson, has crafted a hearwarming, true story about growing up with her father.
When Jackie Robinson retires from baseball and moves his family to Connecticut, the beautiful lake on their property is the center of everyone's fun. The neighborhood children join the Robinson kids for swimming and boating. But oddly, Jackie never goes near the water.
In a dramatic episode that first winter, the children beg to go ice skating on the lake. Jackie says they can go--but only after he tests the ice to make sure it's safe. The children prod and push to get Jackie outside, until hesitantly, he finally goes. Like a blind man with a stick, (contd.)


About the Author
Sharon Robinson, daughter of baseball legend Jackie Robinson, is the author of several works of fiction and nonfiction. She has also written several widely praised nonfiction books about her father, including "Jackie's Nine" "Becoming Your Best Self" and "Promises to Keep: ""How Jackie Robinson Changed America." Kadir Nelson illustrated two Caldecott Honor Books: "Moses "and "Henry's Freedom Box."" Ellington Was Not a Street" by Ntozake Shange won the Coretta Scott King Award. Will Smith s "Just the Two of Us" won an NAACP Image Award, and his new book, "We are the Ship" continues to garner major awards. Nelson showed artistic talent at age 3 and began working in oils by age 16. He lives with his family in San Diego, California."


NPR
Monday, Oct 5, 2009

Sharon Robinson, the daughter of baseball player Jackie Robinson, wanted to teach kids about her father, so she wrote a children's book. But instead of focusing on the achievement for which her father is most famous — breaking baseball's color barrier — she chose a more humble, personal moment. More at NPR.org

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