The Delaney Christmas Carol

By Kay Hooper; Iris Johansen; Fayrene Preston
(Bantam Books, Mass Market Paperbound, 9780553296549, 511pp.)

Publication Date: October 31, 2006

List Price: $7.50*
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Description

From three of the brightest stars in contemporary fiction comes a festive trio of romantic classics about an unforgettable family—and the enchanted heirloom that links one generation to the next.…

Christmas Past
by Iris Johansen
Killara, Arizona, 1893. Kevin Delaney doesn’t know what to make of the Gypsy beauty he finds rummaging in the attic of Killara, his family’s estate. She claims she’s there to recover an old mirror with extraordinary powers. While Kevin doesn’t believe her mystical talk, there’s no doubt a kind of magic is at work on his heart—just in time for Christmas.…

Christmas Present
by Fayrene Preston
Bria Delaney is at Killara for the holidays when she discovers a mirror that reveals more than her reflection. Appearing in the glass is a startlingly handsome man who just as mysteriously disappears—until she meets him in person that night, leading to a Christmas they’ll never forget.…

Christmas Future
by Kay Hooper
A heartbreaking vision in the legendary Delaney mirror drove Brett Delaney to the other side of
the world. Now his father’s death bequeaths him the mirror, and its prophecy sends him back to Killara for Christmas, determined to save the home—and the woman—he’s always loved.




About the Author
Kay Hooper is the award-winning, New York Times bestselling author of the Bishop/Special Crimes Unit series, including Hostage, Haven, Blood Ties, Blood Dreams, and Blood Sins, and she recently launched her new series, The Bishop Files, with The First Prophet. She lives in North Carolina. Visit her at kayhooper.com, facebook.com/BishopPage, and twitter.com/KayHooper.

Iris Johansen is the "New York Times" bestselling author of "Chasing the Night", "Blood Game", "Eve", and "Eight Days to Live", among others. She began writing after her children left home for college, and first achieved success in the early 1980s writing category romances. In 1991, she began writing suspense historical romance novels, and in 1996 she turned to crime fiction, with which she has had great success. She lives near Atlanta, Georgia.

I don't know exactly when I started telling myself stories, but I suspect I always have. A story I remember from beginning to end was one I told myself in high school. As you might suspect, the hero and the heroine were high school students and the story was most definitely a romance. I even sketched out the clothes my heroine wore in certain scenes. Of course, I didn't call them scenes, and I didn't call the young man and woman the hero and heroine. They were just people who played out their lives in my mind at odd moments.
The practice of telling myself stories continued through college and into my adult life. I know I'm not alone when I say housework has always been tremendously boring to me. I've never been able to see any creativity in it as some women do. (These women have my total admiration.) And so as a young mother and housewife, I told myself stories while I vacuumed or washed dishes or cooked dinner.
Today, many published stories later, I consider myself the most fortunate of people. First and foremost I am blessed with two truly wonderful sons, Greg and Jeff. I am their biggest fan, and my life is immeasurably enhanced because I am their mother.
Next is my writing. I've discovered that it's a lot more fun to write a story and have it published than to keep it in my head. To that end, I'm extraordinarily lucky to have a longtime working relationship with the terrific people at Bantam.
I've saved you, my romance readers, for last. Your loyalty and support have come to mean a great deal to me. Thank you. You are the nicest people in the world. Yes, you!
--Fayrene Preston
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