One Hundred and One Ways

One Hundred and One Ways

By Mako Yoshikawa

Bantam, Paperback, 9780553379693, 288pp.

Publication Date: May 2, 2000


"I have spent most of my life in New Jersey, but the blood of a geisha courses through me yet."

If Kiki Takehashi's life is dramatically different from that of her reserved Japanese-American mother, it is light-years away from that of her grandmother, whom she knows only through old family stories. Kiki has recently become engaged to Eric, a handsome, successful New York City lawyer. But at the same time she is haunted--quite literally--by the memory of her friend Phillip, killed the previous year in a mountaineering accident.

Kiki has never met her grandmother Yukiko, for whom she is named. Still, thoroughly American though she is, she feels a secret kinship with her. Kiki is swept up by the story of this strong, proud, passionate woman who, against all odds, in a time and place far different from her own, was sold by her impoverished family, became a famous geisha, and found the love that has so far eluded the rest of the Takehashi women.

Lyrical, haunting, and stunningly evocative, One Hundred and One Ways introduces a powerful and exciting new voice in contemporary fiction.

About the Author
Mako Yoshikawa has studied at Columbia University and at Oxford. She has been a Vera M. Schuyler Fellow of Creative Writing at the Bunting Institute at Harvard University and is a doctoral candidate in English literature at the University of Michigan. She is also the author of the novel <b>One Hundred and One Ways</b>. Yoshikawa lives in Boston.<br><br><br><i>From the Hardcover edition.</i>

Praise For One Hundred and One Ways

"Resembles an intelligent cross between the bestselling Memoirs of a Geisha and the haunted-by-a-lost-love movie Ghost."
--The Detroit News

"Cinematic...satisfyingly ambiguous."
--Los Angeles Times Book Review

"Beautifully written, thoughtfully conceived...the writing resonates with impressive accomplishment."
--The Orlando Sentinel

"Authentic and appealing...a lovely, lyrical novel."
--The Philadelphia Inquirer