Orville

Orville Cover

Orville

A Dog Story

By Robert Andrew Parker (Illustrator); Haven Kimmel

Clarion Books, Hardcover, 9780618159550, 32pp.

Publication Date: September 1, 2003

Description

A big, ugly dog is happy to meet a farmer and his wife who decide to give him a name and a home, but not so happy when they chain him to the barn. All Orville can do is bark to tell the world how unhappy he is, and the more he barks, the more he is left alone. But everything changes when Sally MacIntosh moves into the little house across the road and Orville falls in love.
A beautifully crafted text that blends wry humor with the poignant twang of a country-and-western song is accompanied by dreamy, spare watercolor-and-ink illustrations for a fresh, original picture book that will resonate with anyone who has ever felt lonely or misunderstood.



Praise For Orville

"a tender story...eloquent...children will recognize the sadness and anger as well as the yearning and the powerful bond." BOOKLIST Booklist, ALA

"captures a child's sense of simplicity and exuberance...Parker's winsome portraits illuminate the story...children will cheer when Orville finds love" PUBLISHERS WEEKLY Publishers Weekly

"a poetic...vivid tale...fresh and effective...a heartening...readaloud for kids who know their Orville is out there somewhere." THE BULLETIN OF THE CENTER FOR CHILDREN'S BOOKS, Starred Review The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, Starred

"Poignant and sweet...reads like a country-and-western song...allows the text to shine...readers...will identify with Orville." SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL School Library Journal

"Parker's distinguised watercolor paintings...blend so perfectly with Kimmel's spare, unsentimental language that words and pictures become a veritable poem." THE BOSTON GLOBE Boston Globe

"A big ugly dog is rescued by a farm couple...at its heart, this is a love story." HARTFORD COURANT Hartford Courant

"Parker's distinguished watercolor paintings...blend so perfectly with Kimmel's spare, unsentimental language that words and pictures become a veritable poem." BOSTON GLOBE Boston Globe