Twelve Kinds of Ice

Twelve Kinds of Ice

By Ellen Bryan Obed; Barbara McClintock (Illustrator)

Houghton Mifflin, Hardcover, 9780618891290, 64pp.

Publication Date: November 2012


This is a joyful, spirited gem of a book, as bracing and glorious as a perfect stretch of ice. Newbery Honor author Joyce Sidman

With the first ice a skim on a sheep pail so thin it breaks when touched one family's winter begins in earnest. Next comes ice like panes of glass. And eventually, skating ice Take a literary skate over field ice and streambed, through sleeping orchards and beyond. The first ice, the second ice, the third ice . . . perfect ice . . . the last ice . . . Twelve kinds of ice are carved into twenty nostalgic vignettes, illustrated in elegantly scratched detail by the award-winning Barbara McClintock.

About the Author
Ellen Bryan Obed grew up on a six-acre farm in Waterville, Maine, where she and her siblings waited for the first ice as most children wait for summer or Christmas or a birthday.
Ellen now lives with her husband in Dover-Foxcroft, Maine. There they experience many kinds of ice coming each winter to area streams, lakes, and ponds, and to the nearby Piscataquis River.

Barbara McClintock has written and illustrated many acclaimed books for young readers, including Adele & Simon, an ALA Notable Book, a Children's Book Sense Pick, and a New York Times Book Review Best Illustrated Book of the Year, and Dahlia, a Boston Globe-Horn Book Award Honor Book. She lives in Windham, Connecticut.

Praise For Twelve Kinds of Ice

"Evocative and at the same time marvelously real, this is as much about expectation and the warmth to be found in family and friends as it is about cold ice . . . Everyone will find this a small gem."
Booklist, starred review

Kirkus, starred review

"This is a celebration of play, of winter, and of imagination . . . in an icy collection whose overarching quality is warmth."
Horn Book

"Like a souvenir from a bygone era . . . Today's readers will marvel at the old-fashioned amusements, chronicled with folksy charm."
Publishers Weekly, starred review