Sense and Sensibility

Sense and Sensibility Cover

Sense and Sensibility

By Jane Austen; Peter Conrad (Introduction by)

Everyman's Library, Hardcover, 9780679409878, 408pp.

Publication Date: March 10, 1992


In its marvelously perceptive portrayal of two young women in love, "Sense and Sensibility "is the answer to those who believe that Jane Austen's novels, despite their perfection of form and tone, lack strong feeling.
Its two heroines, Marianne and Elinor so utterly unlike each other both undergo the most violent passions when they are separated from the men they love. What differentiates them, and gives this extraordinary book its complexity and brilliance, is the "way "each expresses her suffering: Marianne young, impetuous, ardent falls into paroxysms of grief when she is rejected by the dashing John Willoughby; while her sister, Elinor wiser, more sensible, more self-controlled masks her despair when it appears that Edward Ferrars is to marry the mean-spirited and cunning Lucy Steele. All, of course, ends happily but not until Elinor's sense and Marianne's sensibility have equally worked to reveal the profound emotional life that runs beneath the surface of Austen's immaculate and irresistible art.

(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)

About the Author
Though the domain of Jane Austen s novels was as circumscribed as her life, her caustic wit and keen observation made her the equal of the greatest novelists in any language. Born the seventh child of the rector of Steventon, Hampshire, on December 16, 1775, she was educated mainly at home. At an early age she began writing sketches and satires of popular novels for her family s entertainment. As a clergyman s daughter from a well-connected family, she had an ample opportunity to study the habits of the middle class, the gentry, and the aristocracy. At twenty-one, she began a novel called"The First Impressions," an early version of"Pride and Prejudice." In 1801, on her father s retirement, the family moved to the fashionable resort of Bath. Two years later she sold the first version of"Northanger Abby"to a London publisher, but the first of her novels to appear was"Sense and Sensibility," published at her own expense in 1811. It was followed by"Pride and Prejudice"(1813), "Mansfield Park"(1814), and"Emma"(1815).

After her father died in 1805, the family first moved to Southampton then to Chawton Cottage in Hampshire. Despite this relative retirement, Jane Austen was still in touch with a wider world, mainly through her brothers; one had become a very rich country gentleman, another a London banker, and two were naval officers. Though her many novels were published anonymously, she had many early and devoted readers, among them the Prince Regent and Sir Walter Scott. In 1816, in declining health, Austen wrote"Persuasion"and revised"Northanger Abby."Her last work, "Sandition," was left unfinished at her death on July 18, 1817. She was buried in Winchester Cathedral. Austen s identity as an author was announced to the world posthumously by her brother Henry, who supervised the publication of"Northanger Abby"and"Persuasion"in 1818."

Praise For Sense and Sensibility

“[Sense and Sensibility] is a subtler and a more searching novel than [its critics’] blunt instruments of perception have been capable of registering, because it deals not with the categories of romantic philosophy but with the transformation of those categories into ways of feeling and behaving. It explores the unsettling romantic alteration of the internal life.” –from the Introduction by Peter Conrad