Confessions of a Justified Sinner

Confessions of a Justified Sinner Cover

Confessions of a Justified Sinner

By James Hogg

Everyman's Library, Hardcover, 9780679417323, 272pp.

Publication Date: December 15, 1992

Description

Robert is a difficult and disturbed young man. He turns to his Calvinist faith for solace but finds it hard to get along with other people. After he falls in with the mysterious and charming Gil-Martin, his actions become more and more extreme. He convinces himself that he is one of the chosen few and that, therefore, all his actions are right and good . . . even murder.
James Hogg ('the Ettrick Shepherd') was a poet, novelist, and farmer whose work was discovered by Sir Walter Scott and admired by writers as different as Wordsworth and Byron.His most famous book, "The Confessions of a Justified Sinner" (1824), is striking in its use of Calvinist doctrine, demonology, and a highly modern psychological perception to tell the story of the criminal Colwan, deluded by occult forces into thinking he represents an instrument of divine justice and vengeance.
Introduction by Roger Lewis
(Book Jacket Status: Not Jacketed)



About the Author
James Hogg (1770-1835) led a troubled life as a writer. Originally a shepherd, he taught himself to write and finally achieved recognition for his epic poem on Mary, Queen of Scots, The Queen's Wake, and was invited to write for the best-selling journal Blackwood's Magazine. However, Hogg soon became a figure of fun and ridicule in the magazine's satirical 'Noctes Ambrosianae', in which the crude and absurd 'Ettrick Shepherd' was openly modelled on him. It is debated whether this was a source of pain and humiliation to the increasingly ostracised Hogg. His masterpiece, The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner, only achieved recognition some 100 years after publication, but is now one of the most important novels in the Scottish canon.