Another Way of Telling

Another Way of Telling

By John Berger; Jean Mohr

Vintage, Paperback, 9780679737247, 304pp.

Publication Date: March 7, 1995

Description
'There are no photographs which can be denied. All photographs have the status of fact. what is to be examined is in what way photography can and cannot give meaning to facts.'


About the Author
John Berger was born in London and now lives in a small village in the French Alps. Most recently he has written the novels "To the Wedding "and "King."
Patricia Macdonald studied at Edinburgh University, receiving her doctorate in 1973. She is well known for her innovative, award-winning aerial images. Her previous publications include "Shadow of Heaven, Order & Chaos, "and "Views of Gala. "


Jean Mohr's longstanding collaboration with John Berger has produced five books, including A Seventh Man and A Fortunate Man. Among his other works are After the Last Sky (with Edward Said) and Side by Side or Face to Face. He lives in Geneva, Switzerland.


Praise For Another Way of Telling

There are no photographs which can be denied. All photographs have the status of fact. What is to be examined is in what way photography can and cannot give meaning to facts." With these words, two of our most thoughtful and eloquent interrogators of the visual offer a singular meditation on the ambiguities of what is seemingly our most straightforward art form.

As constructed by John Berger and the renowned Swiss photographer Jean Mohr, that theory includes images as well as words; not only analysis, but anecdote and memoir. Another Way of Telling explores the tension between the photographer and the photographed, between the picture and its viewers, between the filmed moment and the memories that it so resembles. Combining the moral vision of the critic and the practical engagement of the photographer, Berger and Mohr have produced a work that expands the frontiers of criticism first charged by Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes, and Susan Sontag.

"One of the world's most influential art, critics ... Berger sees clearly with fresh surprise yet profound understanding." -- Washington Times