The Knife Thrower

The Knife Thrower

And Other Stories

By Steven Millhauser

Vintage, Paperback, 9780679781639, 240pp.

Publication Date: February 1999

Included in this short story collection is "The Sisterhood of the Night," now a major motion picture. From the bestselling author of Martin Dressler, this volume explores the magnificent obsessions of the unfettered imagination, as well as the darker, subterranean currents that fuel them.
With the panache of an old-fashioned magician, Steven Millhauser conducts his readers from the dark corners beneath the sunlit world to a balloonist's tour of the heavens. He transforms department stores and amusement parks into alternate universes of infinite plentitude and menace. He unveils the secrets of a maker of automatons and a coven of teenage girls. And on every page of The Knife Thrower and Other Stories, Millhauser confirms his stature as a narrative enchanter in the tradition of Nabokov, Calvino, and Borges.

About the Author
Steven Millhauser was born in 1943 in New York City, and grew up in Connecticut. He received a B.A. from Columbia University in 1965, and went on to pursue a doctorate in English at Brown University. He never completed his dissertation, but did complete a novel that was eventually published in a pared-down form under the title "From the Realm of Morpheus-as well as Edwin Mullhouse." However, it was for his stories that Millhauser became best known; immaculately written, curiously vivid, they trod on fantastic boards in a manner reminiscent of Poe or Borges, but with a distinctively American voice. After "In the Penny Arcade," Millhauser's collections continued with "The Barnum Museum" (1990), "Little Kingdoms" (1993), and "The Knife Thrower and Other Stories" (1998). Steven Millhauser lives in Saratoga Springs, New York, and teaches at Skidmore College.

Praise For The Knife Thrower

"Tantalizing new stories.... Millhauser's ingenuity is delicious." —A. S. Byatt, The Washington Post Book World

"An American writer of surpassing skill.... [Millhauser] renders the impossible itself with precision." —Chicago Tribune

"As Gothic as Poe and as imaginative as Fantasia, Millhauser's deceptive fables are funny and warm. But they're dark as dungeons, too.... He bewitches you." —Entertainment Weekly