The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald

By F. Scott Fitzgerald; Matthew J. Bruccoli (Editor)

Scribner Book Company, Paperback, 9780684804453, 775pp.

Publication Date: September 1995


Today F. Scott Fitzgerald is better known for his novels, but in his own time, his fame rested squarely on his prolific achievement as one of America's most gifted writers of stories and novellas. Now, a half-century after the author's death, the premier Fitzgerald scholar and biographer, Matthew J. Bruccoli, has assembled in one volume the full scope of Fitzgerald's best short fiction: forty-three sparkling masterpieces, ranging from such classic novellas as "The Rich Boy," "May Day," and "The Diamond as Big as the Ritz" to his commercial work for the Saturday Evening Post and its sister "slicks."

For the reader, these stories will underscore the depth and extraordinary range of Fitzgerald's literary talents. Furthermore, Professor Bruccoli's illuminating preface and introductory headnotes establish the literary and biographical settings in which these stories now shine anew with brighter luster than ever.

About the Author
F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896 1940), the author of The Great Gatsby, is considered one of the most influential American writers of the twentieth century.

Born in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1900, Zelda Fitzgerald was an American writer and the wife F. Scott Fitzgerald. A novelist, poet, and dancer, she was an icon of the 1920s.

Praise For The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald

"Bruccoli gives [us]...a virtually new and vastly amplified Fitzgerald." -- Joseph Coates, Chicago Tribune

"This is a valuable collection, whether one reads the stories to delight in Fitzgerald's style, to conjure up a lost era, to learn more about the career of a great American novelist, or simply to gain insight into the human condition." -- Leonard A. Podis, The Cleveland Plain Dealer

"One pleasure of rereading Fitzgerald's stories now is to rediscover just how good some of them in fact are, and how brilliant a handful." -- Jay McInerney, The New York Review of Books

"More than enough to re-establish Fitzgerald as a master of the American short story." -- Mark Caldwell, The Philadelphia Inquirer