That Hideous Strength

That Hideous Strength Cover

That Hideous Strength

A Modern Fairy-Tale for Grown-Ups

By C. S. Lewis

Scribner Book Company, Paperback, 9780743234924, 380pp.

Publication Date: May 13, 2003

Description
Written during the dark hours immediately before and during World War II, C. S. Lewis's Space Trilogy, of which "That Hideous Strength" is the third and final volume, stands alongside such works as Albert Camus's "The Plague" and George Orwell's "1984" as a timely parable that has become timeless, beloved by succeeding generations as much for the sheer wonder of its storytelling as for the significance of its moral concerns.
The final book in C. S. Lewis's acclaimed Space Trilogy, which includes "Out of the Silent Planet" and "Perelandra, That Hideous Strength" concludes the adventures of the matchless Dr. Ransom. The dark forces that were repulsed in "Out of the Silent Planet" and "Perelandra" are massed for an assault on the planet Earth itself. Word is on the wind that the mighty wizard Merlin has come back to the land of the living after many centuries, holding the key to ultimate power for that force which can find him and bend him to its will. A sinister technocratic organization is gaining power throughout Europe with a plan to "recondition" society, and it is up to Ransom and his friends to squelch this threat by applying age-old wisdom to a new universe dominated by science. The two groups struggle to a climactic resolution that brings the Space Trilogy to a magnificent, crashing close.


About the Author
C.S. Lewis was a professor of medieval and Renaissance literature at Oxford and Cambridge universities who wrote more than thirty books in his lifetime, including "The Screwtape Letters, The Chronicles of Narnia, " and "Mere Christianity." He died in 1963.


Praise For That Hideous Strength

The New Yorker


In his usual polished prose, the author creates an elaborate satiric picture of a war between morality and devilry.


The New Yorker


If wit and wisdom, style and scholarship are requisites to passage through the pearly gates, Mr. Lewis will be among the angels.


Los Angeles Times


Lewis, perhaps more than any other twentieth-century writer, forced those who listened to him and read his works to come to terms with their own philosophical presuppositions.

Join the Conversation

Join the Conversation

Sign up today to hear about books and authors from an independent bookstore near you.