Classic Video Games

The Golden Age, 1971-1984

By Brian Eddy
(Shire, Paperback, 9780747810421, 64pp.)

Publication Date: March 20, 2012

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Description

In the early 1970s, video arcade games sprung to life with the advent of Pong and other coin-operated games. Within just a few short years, if you had a quarter, you could go to the video arcade and play Space Invaders, Asteroids, or Pac-Man. If you were lucky enough to have an Atari system hooked up to your television, you could play Frogger or Galaga at home. By the early 1980s, arcade and video games were entrenched as a pop culture phenomenon, with players spending hours in arcades racking up as many points as possible. Arcade games were everywhere: restaurants, bowling alleys, department stores, grocery stores--anywhere that could accommodate a three-foot by five-foot machine. But, just as soon as the phenomenon began, it morphed into something else with the advent of hand-held games and more sophisticated home-gaming systems. Brian Eddy, former executive director, producer, and programmer for Midway Games, traces the evolution of arcade video games in Classic Video Games, giving readers an inside look at the stratospheric rise--and collapse--of the industry. Readers will reminisce about their favorite games, such as Centipede, Ms. Pac-Man, Tron, and Star Wars as they relive the glory days of the classic video game rage of the 1970s and 1980s.




About the Author

Brian R. Eddy is a technology consultant with Rand McNally. Previously, he was executive director and producer with Midway Home Entertainment, Inc., where he also served as a programmer and designer for Midway Games. Eddy designed several of the most popular and influential pinball machines of the 1990s, including Attack From Mars and Medieval Madness. He also was the programmer on several other influential machines, including FunHouse, The Machine: Bride of Pin*Bot, and Indiana Jones: The Pinball Adventure. After the closure of Midway's pinball division in 1999, Eddy moved to Midway's video game division, where he worked on Psi-Ops: The Mindgate Conspiracy and several games in the Mortal Kombat franchise. Eddy's pinball machines consistently rank in the top 10, both in popularity and in the highest prices paid for pinball machines.

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