By M. T. Anderson

Candlewick Press (MA), Paperback, 9780763662622, 299pp.

Publication Date: July 2012

Identity crises, consumerism, and star-crossed teenage love in a futuristic society where people connect to the Internet via feeds implanted in their brains.
For Titus and his friends, it started out like any ordinary trip to the moon - a chance to party during spring break and play with some stupid low-grav at the Ricochet Lounge. But that was before the crazy hacker caused all their feeds to malfunction, sending them to the hospital to lie around with nothing inside their heads for days. And it was before Titus met Violet, a beautiful, brainy teenage girl who has decided to fight the feed and its omnipresent ability to categorize human thoughts and desires. Following in the footsteps of George Orwell, Anthony Burgess, and Kurt Vonnegut Jr., M. T. Anderson has created a not-so-brave new world and a smart, savage satire that has captivated readers with its view of an imagined future that veers unnervingly close to the here and now.

About the Author
M.T. Anderson is the author of the Pals in Peril series; "The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing", which won the National Book Award; "The Game of Sunken Places"; "Burger Wuss"; "Thirsty"; and "Feed", which was a finalist for the National Book Award, a "Boston Globe-Horn Book" Honor Book, and the winner of the "Los Angeles Times" Book Award for Young Adults. He lives in Boston, Massachusetts. Visit him at MT-Anderson.com.

Praise For Feed

This satire offers a thought-provoking and scathing indictment that may prod readers to examine the more sinister possibilities of corporate-and media-dominated culture.
—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

What really puts the teeth in the bite...is Anderson's brillinat satiric vision in the semaless creation of this imagined but believable world. The writing is relentlessly funny, clever in its observations and characters....
—Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books (starred review)

The crystalline realization of this wildly dystopic future carries in it obvious and enormous implications for today's readers -- satire at its finest.
—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

M.T. Anderson has created the perfect device for an ingenious satire of corporate America and our present-day value system...Like those in a funhouse mirror, the reflections the novel shows us may be ugly and distorted, bu they are undeniably ourselves.
—The Horn Book (starred review)