Working God's Mischief

Working God's Mischief Cover

Working God's Mischief

By Glen Cook

Tor Books, Hardcover, 9780765334206, 432pp.

Publication Date: March 11, 2014

Description

Arnhand, Castauriga, and Navaya lost their kings. The Grail Empire lost its empress. The Church lost its Patriarch, though he lives on as a fugitive. The Night lost Kharoulke the Windwalker, an emperor amongst the most primal and terrible gods. The Night goes on, in dread. The world goes on, in dread. The ice builds and slides southward.

New kings come. A new empress will rule. Another rump polishes the Patriarchal Throne.

But there is something new under the sun. The oldest and fiercest of the Instrumentalities has been destroyed--by a mortal. There is no new Windwalker, nor will there ever be.

The world, battered by savage change, limps toward its destiny. And the ice is coming.

"Working God's Mischief" is the savage, astounding new novel of The Instrumentalities of Night, by Glen Cook, a modern master of military fantasy.



About the Author
Born in 1944, Glen Cook grew up in northern California, served in the U.S. Navy, attended the University of Missouri, and was one of the earliest graduates of the well-known "Clarion" workshop SF writers. Since 1971 he has published a large number of science fiction and fantasy novels, including the "Dread Empire" series, the occult-detective "Garrett" novels, and the very popular "Black Company" sequence that began with the publication of "The Black Company" in 1984. Among his SF novels is "A Passage at Arms." After working many years for General Motors, Cook now writes full-time. He lives near St. Louis, Missouri, with his wife Carol.


Praise For Working God's Mischief

“Cook follows up on his lauded Black Company military fantasy with another powerful series, combining a fast-moving plot with a harsh, credible world of religious conflicts, ravenous aristocrats, and refugees struggling to survive.”
—VOYA on Lord of the Silent Kingdom

“The thing about Glen Cook is that with The Black Company he singlehandedly changed the face of fantasy—something a lot of people didn’t notice and maybe still don’t. He brought the story down to a human level, dispensing with the cliché archetypes of princes, kings, and evil sorcerers. Reading his stuff was like reading Vietnam War fiction on peyote.”
—Steven Erikson, New York Times bestselling author of the Malazan series

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