A Lost Lady

By Willa Cather; Susan J. Rosowski (Essay by); Kari A. Ronning (Editor)
(University of Nebraska Press, Paperback, 9780803264304, 371pp.)

Publication Date: April 2003

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Description
First published in 1923, "A Lost Lady" is one of Willa Cather's classic novels about life on the Great Plains. It harks back to Nebraska's early history and contrasts those days with an unsentimental portrait of the materialistic world that supplanted the frontier. In her subtle portrait of Marian Forrester, whose life unfolds in the midst of this disquieting transition, Cather created one of her most memorable and finely drawn characters. This Willa Cather Scholarly Edition of "A Lost Lady" is edited according to standards set by the Committee for Scholarly Editions of the Modern Language Association. The historical essay describes the origin, writing, and reception of the novel as well as motion pictures that were later based on it; and a selection of archival photographs illuminates the connection between the novel and the people and places from Cather's formative years in Nebraska. Explanatory notes identify locations, literary references, persons, events, and specialized terminology. The textual essays describe the production and subsequent revisions of the text.



About the Author
A Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Willa Cather s work was profoundly influenced by her upbringing in rural Nebraska. During her young adulthood Cather proved herself intelligent and capable, initially training for a career as a medical doctor, but discovered a love of, and talent for, writing while attending the University of Nebraska. Following graduation, Cather worked as a journalist for several women s magazines before becoming a high school teacher; an opportunity work as an editor at McClure s provided Cather with her first chance to publish as the magazine serialized her first novel, Alexander s Bridge, to critical acclaim. This was soon followed by works that have since become best-loved American classics, including My ?ntonia, The Song of the Lark, and her Pulitzer-Prize winner, One of Ours. Cather died in 1947 at the age of 73.

Roger L. Welsch is a television personality and is the author of nearly thirty books, including "It's Not the End of the Earth, but You Can See It from Here" and "Touching the Fire: Buffalo Dancers, the Sky Bundle, and Other Tales," both available in Bison Books editions. Linda K. Welsch is an acclaimed Nebraska artist. Susan J. Rosowski (1942-2004) is the author of "Birthing a Nation: Gender, Creativity, and the West in American Literature" (Nebraska 1999).

Richard C. Harris is a professor and the director of humanities at the Webb Institute in Glen Cove, New York. Frederick M. Link is a professor emeritus of English at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the textual editor of Cather's "Obscure Destinies," "The Professor's House," and "Shadows on the Rock," Kari A. Ronning is an assistant editor for the Willa Cather Scholarly Edition series at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
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