Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson Cover

Andrew Jackson

By Wilentz

Times Books, Hardcover, 9780805069259, 195pp.

Publication Date: December 27, 2005

Description

The towering figure who remade American politics the champion of the ordinary citizen and the scourge of entrenched privilege

The Founding Fathers espoused a republican government, but they were distrustful of the common people, having designed a constitutional system that would temper popular passions. But as the revolutionary generation passed from the scene in the 1820s, a new movement, based on the principle of broader democracy, gathered force and united behind Andrew Jackson, the charismatic general who had defeated the British at New Orleans and who embodied the hopes of ordinary Americans. Raising his voice against the artificial inequalities fostered by birth, station, monied power, and political privilege, Jackson brought American politics into a new age.
Sean Wilentz, one of America's leading historians of the nineteenth century, recounts the fiery career of this larger-than-life figure, a man whose high ideals were matched in equal measure by his failures and moral blind spots, a man who is remembered for the accomplishments of his eight years in office and for the bitter enemies he made. It was in Jackson's time that the great conflicts of American politics urban versus rural, federal versus state, free versus slave crystallized, and Jackson was not shy about taking a vigorous stand. It was under Jackson that modern American politics began, and his legacy continues to inform our debates to the present day.



About the Author
Sean Wilentz, a professor of history at Princeton University, is the author or editor of several books, including "Chants Democratic" and "The Rise of American Democracy." He has also written for" The New York Times," the "Los Angeles Times," "The New Republic," and other publications. He lives in Princeton, New Jersey.Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., (1917-2007) was the preeminent political historian of our time. For more than half a century, he was a cornerstone figure in the intellectual life of the nation and a fixture on the political scene. He won two Pulitzer prizes for "The Age of Jackson" (1946) and "A Thousand Days" (1966), and in 1988 received the National Humanities Medal. He published the first volume of his autobiography, "A Life in the Twentieth Century," in 2000.

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