Shepherd's Notes

Shepherd's Notes Cover

Shepherd's Notes

Lectures to My Students

By Albert Meredith; Charles Haddon Spurgeon

Holman Reference, Paperback, 9780805491968, 112pp.

Publication Date: January 1, 1999

Description

Shepherd's Notes- Christian Classics Series is designed to give readers a quick, step by step overview of some of the enduring treasures of the Christian faith. They are designed to be used along side the classic itself- either in individual study or in a study group. The faithful of all generations have found spiritual nourishment in the Scriptures and in the works of Christians of earlier generations. Martin Luther and John Calvin would not have become who they were apart from their reading Augustine. God used the writings of Martin Luther to move John Wesley from a religion of dead works to an experience at Aldersgate in which his "heart was strangely warmed." Shepherd's Notes will give pastors, laypersons, and students access to some of the treasures of Christian faith.



About the Author
Meredith has been the Senior Pastor at Wedgwood Baptist Church for seventeen years.

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (1834-1892) was born in Kelvedon, England. He came from a strong Christian family and he developed a love for reading books. At fifteen, a stormy day changed his plans and he went to a Methodist chapel in Colchester, where the service was almost given up for low attendance. At this service the message was look to Jesus to be saved, and he became a Christian. He never went to college, but he became a scholar through self-study. His parents were Congregationalists but he saw the need for Baptism after he read the Bible. He preached his first sermon at Teversham in Cambridgeshire and people began to respect him. The New Park Street Chapel in London was deserted and the young man from Cambridge was recommended. Spurgeon thought it a mistake and that he would not be fit for London. He was "borne down with a sense of weakness." His preaching was blessed with great success of effect and attendance. Soon the need of a much larger building was needed and the Metropolitan Tabernacle was built in 1861. He became a well-known preacher and is regarded as the "Prince of Preachers."