The Labor of Job

The Labor of Job Cover

The Labor of Job

The Biblical Text as a Parable of Human Labor

By Antonio Negri; Matteo Mandarini (Translator); Michael Hardt (Foreword by)

Duke University Press, Paperback, 9780822346340, 138pp.

Publication Date: January 1, 2010

Description
In "The Labor of Job," the renowned Marxist political philosopher Antonio Negri develops an unorthodox interpretation of the Old Testament book of Job, a canonical text of Judeo-Christian thought. In the biblical narrative, the pious Job is made to suffer for no apparent reason. The story revolves around his quest to understand why he must bear, and why God would allow, such misery. Conventional readings explain the tale as an affirmation of divine transcendence. When God finally speaks to Job, it is to assert his sovereignty and establish that it is not Job's place to question what God allows. In Negri's materialist reading, Job does not recognize God's transcendence. He denies it, and in so doing becomes a co-creator of himself and the world.

"The Labor of Job" was first published in Italy in 1990. Negri began writing it in the early 1980s, while he was a political prisoner in Italy, and it was the first book he completed during his exile in France (1983 97). As he writes in the preface, understanding suffering was for him in the early 1980s an essential element of resistance. . . . It was the problem of liberation, in prison and in exile, from within the absoluteness of Power. Negri presents a Marxist interpretation of Job's story. He describes it as a parable of human labor, one that illustrates the impossibility of systems of measure, whether of divine justice (in Job's case) or the value of labor (in the case of late-twentieth-century Marxism). In the foreword, Michael Hardt elaborates on this interpretation. In his commentary, Roland Boer considers Negri's reading of the book of Job in relation to the Bible and biblical exegesis. "The Labor of Job" provides an intriguing and accessible entry into the thought of one of today's most important political philosophers.



About the Author
Antonio Negri was formerly professor of political science at the universities of Padua and Paris VIII. He is the author of many books. Those available in English include "Insurgencies: Constituent Power and the Modern State" and "The Savage Anomaly: The Power of Spinoza s Metaphysics and Politics." Matteo Mandarini is a lecturer in the School of Business and Management at Queen Mary University of London. He has translated books and essays by Negri including "Time for Revolution." Michael Hardt is Professor of Literature and Italian at Duke University. He and Negri are the authors of "Multitude "and" Empire." Roland Boer is Research Professor at the University of Newcastle, Australia. He is the author of "Political Myth: On the Use and Abuse of Biblical Themes," also published by Duke University Press."