On Leave

By Daniel Anselme; David Bellos (Translator)
(Faber & Faber, Hardcover, 9780865478954, 198pp.)

Publication Date: March 4, 2014

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Description

A long-lost French novel in which three soldiers return home from an unpopular, unspeakable war
When "On Leave "was published in Paris in 1957, as France's engagement in Algeria became ever more bloody, it told people things they did not want to hear. It vividly described what it was like for soldiers to return home from an unpopular war in a faraway place. The book received a handful of reviews, it was never reprinted, it disappeared from view. With no outcome to the war in sight, its power to disturb was too much to bear.
Through David Bellos's translation, this lost classic has been rediscovered. Spare, forceful, and moving, it describes a week in the lives of a sergeant, a corporal, and an infantryman, each home on leave in Paris. What these soldiers have to say can't be heard, can't even be spoken; they find themselves strangers in their own city, unmoored from their lives. Full of sympathy and feeling, informed by the many hours Daniel Anselme spent talking to conscripts in Paris, "On Leave "is a timeless evocation of what the history books can never record: the shame and the terror felt by men returning home from war.




About the Author
Daniel Anselme was born Daniel Rabinovitch in 1927, and adopted the name Anselme while serving in the French Resistance with his father. Anselme traveled widely as a journalist, and was known as a raconteur and a habitue of Left Bank cafes. A vocal protester of France's war with Algeria, he addressed the war in "On Leave" (1957), his first novel. Anselme published a second novel, "Relations", in 1964; ran the journal "Les Cahiers de Mai" from 1968 to 1974; and was one of the leaders of Solidarity Radio in Paris in 1981-82. He published a semiautobiographical account of his wartime experiences called "The Secret Companion" in 1984, and died five years later in Paris.

David Bellos is the director of the Program in Translation and Intercultural Communication at Princeton University, where he is also a professor of French and comparative literature. He has won many awards for his translations of Georges Perec, Ismail Kadare, and others, including the Man Booker International Translator's Award. He also received the Prix Goncourt for "George Perec: A Life in Words". He is the author of the book "Is That a Fish in Your Ear? Translation and the Meaning of Everything".
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