How I Learned That I Could Push the Button

By Jerome Gold
(Black Heron Press, Hardcover, 9780930773670, 157pp.)

Publication Date: January 2010

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Description
These essays compose a compact history of the effects of the war in Viet Nam on American life. Colored by the impact of the war, they portray some of the ways in which we looked at later events. Certain themes arise again and again-the perceived threat presented by the Other, the permeability of borders that separate like from other, the tension between loyalty to one's fellows and obligation to nation or country or society, the distrust of abstraction and those who use abstraction to manipulate us. These essays, drawing on the author's direct experience of one war and his peripheral experience of another, may be considered a companion volume to his acclaimed novel, Sergeant Dickinson.



About the Author
Jerome Gold is the author of fourteen books, including The Moral Life of Soldiers and the memoir, Paranoia & Heartbreak: Fifteen Years in a Juvenile Facility. Russell Banks said about this book: "I've finished reading Jerome Gold's terrific book cover to cover without a break... It's a powerful and very tenderhearted book without a soupcon of sentimentality. Unforgettable!" Mr. Gold's novels include Sergeant Dickinson, about which the New York Times Book Review said: "[It] belongs on the high, narrow shelf of first-rate fiction about battlefield experience." He has published stories, essays, reviews and poems in Chiron Review, Moon City Review, Fiction Review, Boston Review, Hawaii Review, and other journals.
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