The Postmistress

By Sarah Blake
(Wheeler Publishing, Hardcover, Large Print, 9781410425768, 529pp.)

Publication Date: May 2010

Other Editions of This Title: Compact Disc, Hardcover, Paperback, Audio Cassette, Compact Disc, Paperback

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Selected by Indie Booksellers for the February 2010 Indie Next List
“This compelling story is the perfect answer to that request, 'I want a really good book I can get lost in!' This WWII story of three memorable women has a strong sense of place -- from the shores of Cape Cod to war-torn London. The reader will relish every word and then want to pass it along to a friend.”
-- Elizabeth Merritt, Titcomb's Bookshop, East Sandwich, MA


Description

It is 1940. While war rages in Europe, President Roosevelt promises he won't send American boys to fight. In the small Cape Cod town of Franklin, postmistress Iris James firmly believes that her job is to deliver and keep people's secrets. Meanwhile, seemingly fearless American radio gal Frankie Bard is reporting from the Blitz in London, imploring listeners to pay attention to what is going on. "The Postmistress" is a tale of lost innocence.




NPR
Monday, May 31, 2010

Susan Stamberg gathers recommendations from booksellers Rona Brinlee, Lucia Silva and Daniel Goldin. Their selections for summertime reading include books about small-town America, a polygamist father in over his head, and a postmistress in New England during World War II. More at NPR.org

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NPR
Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010

The Postmistress, a new novel by Sarah Blake, tells two stories set during the early days of World War II. In the first, an American radio reporter sends back dispatches from London during the Blitz, and in the second, two residents of a small Massachusetts town respond to those reports. More at NPR.org

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Conversation Starters from ReadingGroupChoices.com

CONVERSATION STARTERS

  1. Much of The Postmistress is centered on Frankie’s radio broadcasts—either Frankie broadcasting them, or the other characters listening to them. How do you think the experience of listening to the news via radio in the 1940s differs from our experience of getting news from the television or the internet? What is the difference between hearing news and seeing pictures, or reading accounts of news? Do you think there is something that the human voice conveys that the printed word cannot?

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