The Tortoise or the Hare

The Tortoise or the Hare

By Toni Morrison; Slade Morrison; Joe Cepeda (Illustrator)

Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books, Hardcover, 9781416983347, 32pp.

Publication Date: September 7, 2010

Description

Everyone knows that in the story of the Tortoise and the Hare the slow and steady tortoise wins always wins. Or does he? In this energetic retelling Hare wins but the Tortoise has the story to tell. So you decide, what makes a winner?



About the Author
Toni Morrison was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1993. She is the author of many novels, including "Sula", "Song of Solomon", "Beloved", and, most recently, "A Mercy". She has also received the National Book Critics Circle Award and a Pulitzer Prize for her fiction.

Slade Morrison was born in Ohio and educated in New York City. He studied art at SUNY Purchase and collaborated with his mother, Toni Morrison, on five books for children.

Joe Cepeda is the illustrator of many vibrant and popular picture books, including The Journey of Oliver K. Woodman by Darcy Pattison and Cub's Big World by Sarah L. Thomson. He lives in Southern California. www.joecepeda.com


Praise For The Tortoise or the Hare

Jimi Hare is fast and Jamey Tortoise is smart. Everyone avoids them, calls them names, and demeans their talents as tricks. When Jimi and Jamey sign up for a race, one practices while the other plans. The tortoise is told that reversals, such as the winner who loses, make the most satisfying newspaper story. The hare hears that the largest crowd gets more attention than the loudest cheers. On the day of the race, the tortoise travels on bus, train, and plane, while the hare dances, runs, and invents new stunts to draw the crowd. Though Jimi Hare crosses the finish line first, all who know Aesop’s fable understand the headline–“WINNER LOSES! LOSER WINS!” Giving a new twist to an old tale, these two lonely and talented characters eventually become friends. Any reading of this tale will depend on knowledge of Aesop’s fable. Illustrations are rendered in oil paints showing bright animated characters against textured backgrounds. Occasional rhymes (“Because he always won, they said he was no fun”) enliven the text. This contemporary retelling should spark interesting discussions.– -SLJ
-Toni and Slade Morrison