Real Pirates

The Untold Story of the Whydah from Slave Ship to Pirate Ship

By Barry Clifford; Kenneth J. Kinkor; Kenneth Garrett (Photographer)
National Geographic Society, Paperback, 9781426202629, 175pp.

Publication Date: September 18, 2007

List Price: $19.95*
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Description

The riveting story of the slave ship Whydah,captured by pirates and later sunk in a fierce storm off the coast of Massachusetts, energizes this lavish companion book to a unique exhibition on a five-year U.S. tour. Packed with plunder from more than 50 captured ships, the Whydah was discovered by underwater explorer Barry Clifford in 1984. Now, for the first time, its treasure holds are unlocked for public view.

More than 200 items were retrieved from the ocean floor: the telltale ship's bell, inscribed "Whydah Galley 1716"; coins and jewelry, buttons and cufflinks; muskets, cannons, and swords; everyday objects including teakettles and tableware, gaming tokens, and clay pipes. The artifacts provide an unprecedented glimpse into the raucous world of 18th-century pirating and shed light on the link between the slave trade and piracy during those tumultuous times.

Built to transport human captives from Africa to the Caribbean, the Whydah made one such voyage before being captured in 1717 by Sam Bellamy, the boldest pirate of his day. Two months later, in one of the worst nor'easters ever, the ship sank, drowning all but 2 of the 146 people aboard. For anyone intrigued by the lore of piracy, the mystery of shipwrecks, or the sad and salty intertwining of slave and pirate history, Real Pirates has the answers.

National Geographic supports K-12 educators with ELA Common Core Resources.
Visit www.natgeoed.org/commoncore for more information.




About the Author
Barry Clifford is an undersea explorer who discovered and excavated the Whydah, the first pirate shipwreck ever authenticated, off the coast of Cape Cod. He established the Expedition Whydah Sea Lab and Learning Center in Provincetown, Massachusetts, where he also owns and operates a pirate museum.



Zahi Hawass, Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities as well as one of National Geographic's Explorers-in-Residence, is credited with such monumental discoveries as the tombs of the Giza pyramid builders and the Valley of the Golden Mummies, which inspired a best-selling book. He has been a consultant for film, television, and magazines, and he lectures throughout the world. In 2000, Hawass received the Distinguished Scholar award from the Association of Egyptian American Scholars.
Kenneth Garrett, a specialist in archaeology, paleontology, and ancient cultures, has photographed archaeological sites and subjects worldwide on assignment for National Geographic. His work has also been featured in many books, including two of Dr. Hawass's previous works.
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