The Nearest Exit

The Nearest Exit

By Olen Steinhauer; David Pittu (Read by)

Macmillan Audio, Compact Disc, 9781427209733

Publication Date: May 11, 2010

Description

Milo Weaver has nowhere to turn but back to the CIA in Olen Steinhauer's brilliant follow-up to the "New York Times" bestselling espionage novel The Tourist

The Tourist, Steinhauer's first contemporary novel after his awardwinning historical series, was a runaway hit, spending three weeks on the New York Times bestseller list and garnering rave reviews from critics.

Now faced with the end of his quiet, settled life, reluctant spy Milo Weaver has no choice but to turn back to his old job as a "tourist." Before he can get back to the CIA's dirty work, he has to prove his loyalty to his new bosses, who know little of Milo's background and less about who is really pulling the strings in the government above the Department of Tourism-or in the outside world, which is beginning to believe the legend of its existence. Milo is suddenly in a dangerous position, between right and wrong, between powerful self-interested men, between patriots and traitors-especially as a man who has nothing left to lose.



About the Author

OLEN STEINHAUER is a two-time Edgar award finalist and has been shortlisted for the Anthony, the Macavity, the Ellis Peters Historical Dagger, the Ian Fleming Steel Dagger, and the Barry awards. Raised in Virginia, he lives in Leipzig, Germany.  

David Pittu is a two-time Tony nominee, and has narrated over 36 audiobooks, including Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch, which earned an Audie for literary fiction and best male narrator. His other work includes The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides and An American Spy  by Olen Steinhauer. Pittu has also read for Rick Riordan, Ann Rice, and Keigo Higashino, among others.





Praise For The Nearest Exit

"Pittu’s intense narration reflects Weaver’s conflict between his training and his emerging insecurities about his work and family...Crisp and concentrated, Pittu unwinds the gripping action with energy. As Weaver searches for a traitor among the tourists, Pittu’s characterization of the brilliant, obese German espionage administrator adds impact." -- AudioFile Magazine