The Lotus Eaters

By Tatjana Soli (A); Kirsten Potter (4)
(Blackstone Audiobooks, Audio Cassette, 9781441737106)

Publication Date: March 2010

Other Editions of This Title: Paperback, Hardcover, Paperback, Compact Disc, Compact Disc, MP3 CD

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Selected by Indie Booksellers for the April 2010 Indie Notables
“Unlike any other story of war I've read, The Lotus Eaters sees the beauty amidst the destruction as only a story told through the eyes of a photographer can. It is at once a sweeping love story, a tragedy of humanity, and a fresh look at a war that transformed everything.”
-- Julia Callahan, Book Soup, West Hollywood, CA



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Sunday, Jul 31, 2011

After I-95 peters out, US 1 is the only way to get to the jagged Maine coastline. Quaint local stores and the occasional tourist trap line those sections of the road. For the last installment of our series on vacation reading around the country, guest host Linda Wertheimer talks with Susan Porter, owner of Maine Coast Books about what her customers are reading this summer. More at NPR.org

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NPR
Tuesday, Aug 3, 2010

As a librarian and a reader, Nancy Pearl scours the shelves in search of hidden treasures -- titles you may have missed. Her findings include two chilling thrillers, one exquisite 1960s memoir, a lively biography of George Orwell, an example of historical fiction at its very best, and much more fiction, nonfiction and poetry. More at NPR.org

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Conversation Starters from ReadingGroupChoices.com

CONVERSATION STARTERS

  1. Soli pulled the novel's title, The Lotus Eaters, from an episode in Homer's The Odyssey and uses Homer's description of the land of the lotus-eaters as the novel's opening epigraph. What connection do you see between Homer's lotus-eaters and the main characters of this novel? What, if anything, in this novel acts like the lotus described by Homer, so powerful and seductive it causes one to abandon all thoughts of home? Does each character have a different "lotus" that draws them in? How does the title illuminate the main themes of the novel? 

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