Making a Change for Good

Making a Change for Good

A Guide to Compassionate Self-Discipline

By Cheri Huber

Shambhala Publications, Paperback, 9781590302088, 128pp.

Publication Date: March 13, 2007

According to Zen teacher Cheri Huber, we are conditioned to think that if we were only a little better in some way, we would be happy: "Life isn't the way it should be and it's my fault " But, Huber says, no amount of self-punishment will ever make us happy or bring us control over life's problems.
The help we are looking for is really found in self-acceptance and kindness toward ourselves. By simply allowing ourselves to be guided by our innate intelligence and generosity, which are our authentic nature, we are able to be compassionately present to what's happening now. Compassionate self-discipline--the will to take positive steps in life--is found through nothing other than being present. When we are present and aware, we are not engaged in distracting, addictive behaviors. If we simply cultivate our ability to pay attention and focus on what is here in this moment, our experience can be authentic, awake, honest, and joyful.
The book includes a guided thirty-day program of daily meditation, contemplation, and journaling.

About the Author
Cheri Huber has been a student and teacher of Zen for 30 years. She is the author of 17 books including There Is Nothing Wrong with You, The Fear Book, The Depression Book, When Youre Falling, Dive, and the popular workbook How You Do Anything Is How You Do Everything. She founded the Mountain View Zen Center in Mountain View, California, and the Zen Monastery Practice Center in Murphys, California, and teaches in both communities. Cheri conducts workshops and retreats around the United States and abroad.

Praise For Making a Change for Good

 "Huber has been a Zen teacher for many years, but this does not feel at all like a Zen book. . . . The warmth of Huber's style and advice reinforce her message that self-acceptance, rather than punishment, is more likely to result in the changes we seek."—Library Journal

"Huber challenges us to see our resistances and to accept our conditioned thoughts and behaviors—to live in the present moment with awareness."—Spirituality & Health magazine