The Perfect American

The Perfect American

By Peter Stephan Jungk; Michael Hofmann (Translator)

Other Press (NY), Paperback, 9781590515778, 186pp.

Publication Date: December 4, 2012

"The Perfect American" is a fictionalized biography of Walt Disney's final months, as narrated by Wilhelm Dantine, an Austrian cartoonist who worked for Disney in the 40s and 50s, illustrating sequences for "Sleeping Beauty." It is also the story of Dantine himself, who desperately seeks Disney's recognition at the risk of his own ruin.
Peter Stephan Jungk has infused a new energy into the genre of fictionalized biography. Dantine, imbued with a sense of European superiority, first refuses to submit to Disney's rule, but is nevertheless fascinated by the childlike omnipotence of a man who identifies with Mickey Mouse. We discover Walt's delusions of immortality via cryogenic preservation, his tirades alongside his Abraham Lincoln talking robot, his invitation of Nikita Khruschev to Disneyland once he learns that the Soviet Premier wants to visit the park, his utopian visions of his EPCOT project, and his backyard labyrinth of toy trains. Yet, if at first Walt seems to have a magic wand granting him all his wishes, we soon discover that he is as tortured as the man who tells his story.
After Disney refuses to acknowledge Dantine's self-professed talent and hard work, he fires the frustrated cartoonist for writing, along with other staff members, an anonymous polemical memorandum regarding Disney's jingoistic politics. Years later, in the late 60s, still deeply wounded by his dismissal, Dantine follows Disney's trail to capture what makes Walt tick. Dantine wants us to grasp what it is like to live and breathe around the man who thought of himself as more famous than Santa Claus. Walt's wife Lillian, his confidante and perhaps his mistress Hazel, his brother Roy, his children Diane and Sharon, his close and ill-treated collaborators, and famous figures such as Peter Ustinov, Salvador Dali, Andy Warhol, and Geraldine Chaplin, all contribute to the novel's animation, its feel for the life of the Disney world.
This deeply researched work not only provides interesting interpretations of what made Walt Disney a central figure in American popular culture, but also explores the complex expectations of gifted European immigrants who came to the United States after World War II with preconceived notions of how to achieve the American dream.

About the Author
Peter Stephen Jungk was born in Los Angeles and grew up in the United States and Europe. He has published seven internationally acclaimed books in German, including Stechpalmenwald (1978), a collection of short stories set in Hollywood. Tigor (Handsel Books, Fall 2004) is the story of a mathematician who returns to the city of his birth for a conference where his life's work is disproved, literally, causing him a nervous collapse that sets him off on a divine misadventure. The novel was a finalist for the British Foreign Book Award in 2003.

Michael Hofmann is a poet and frequent contributor to "The New York Times Book Review", and is widely regarded as one of the world's foremost translators of works from German to English. He lives in London.

Praise For The Perfect American

"a surreal, meditative, episodic account of the last days of Walt Disney." -The New York Times