A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Dubliners (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

By James Joyce; Kevin J. H. Dettmar (Illustrator); Kevin J. H. Dettmar (Introduction by)
(Barnes & Noble Classics, Paperback, 9781593080310, 464pp.)

Publication Date: July 2004

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Description
"A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Dubliners," by James Joyce, is part of the "Barnes & Noble Classics"""series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of "Barnes & Noble Classics" New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriateAll editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. "Barnes & Noble Classics "pulls together a constellation of influencesbiographical, historical, and literaryto enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works.Widely regarded as the greatest stylist of twentieth-century English literature, James Joyce deserves the term revolutionary. His literary experiments in form and structure, language and content, signaled the modernist movement and continue to influence writers today. His two earliest, and perhaps most accessible, successes"A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man" and "Dubliners"are here brought together in one volume. Both works reflect Joyce's lifelong love-hate relationship with Dublin and the Irish culture that formed him.
In the semi-autobiographical "Portrait," young Stephen Dedalus yearns to be an artist, but first must struggle against the forces of church, school, and society, which fetter his imagination and stifle his soul. The book's inventive style is apparent from its opening pages, a record of an infant's impressions of the world around himand one of the first examples of the stream of consciousness technique.
Comprising fifteen stories, "Dubliners" presents a community of mesmerizing, humorous, and haunting charactersa group portrait. The interactions among them form one long meditation on the human condition, culminating with The Dead, one of Joyce's most graceful compositions centering around a character's epiphany. A carefully woven tapestry of Dublin life at the turn of the last century, "Dubliners" realizes Joyce's ambition to give his countrymen one good look at themselves. Kevin J. H. Dettmar is Professor of English and Cultural Studies at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. He is the author or editor of a half-dozen books on James Joyce, modernist literature, and rock music. He is currently finishing a term as President of the Modernist Studies Association.



About the Author
James Joyce, the twentieth century's most influential novelist, was born in Dublin on February 2, 1882. The oldest of ten children, he grew up in a family that went from prosperity to penury because of his father's wastrel behavior. After receiving a rigorous Jesuit education, twenty-year-old Joyce renounced his Catholicism and left Dublin in 1902 to spend most of his life as a writer in exile in Paris, Trieste, Rome, and Zurich. On one trip back to Ireland, he fell in love with the now famous Nora Barnacle on June 16, the day he later chose as "Bloomsday" in his novel "Ulysses. "Nara was an uneducated Galway girl who became his lifelong companion an the mother of his two children. In debt and drinking heavily, Joyce lived for thirty-six years on the Continent, supporting himself first by teaching jobs, then trough the patronage of Mrs. Harold McCormick (Edith Rockerfeller) and the English feminist and editor Harriet Shaw Weaver. His writings include "Chamber music "(1907), "Dubliners "(1914), "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man "(1916), "Exiles "(1918), "Ulysses "(1922), "Poems Penyeach "(1927), "Finnegans Wake "(1939), and an early draft of "A Portrait of a Young Man, Stephan Hero "(1944). "Ulysses "required seven years to complete, and his masterpiece, "Finnegans Wake, "took seventeen. Both works revolutionized the form, structure, and content of the novel. Joyce died in Zurich in 1941.

Kevin J. H. Dettmar is W. M. Keck Distinguished Service Professor and Chair in the Department of English, Pomona College, California.

David Bradshaw is Reader in English Literature at Oxford University and Hawthornden Fellow and Tutor in English Literature at Worcester College, Oxford. He has edited many works of modernist literature, including the Oxford World's Classics editions of Lawrence's "Women in Love" (1998), Woolf's "Mrs Dalloway" (2000) and "To The Lighthouse" (2006), and the Penguin Classics editions of Waugh's "Decline and Fall" (2001) and "The Good Soldier" (2002). He is also the editor of "A Concise Companion to Modernism" (Blackwell, 2003) and is Victorian and Modern Literature Editor of the "Review of English Studies,"

Kevin J. H. Dettmar is Professor of English and Cultural Studies at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. He has written and edited five books on James Joyce, modernist literature and culture, and rock & roll, edited the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of Joyce's "Portrait of the Artist" "as a Young Man" and "Dubliners," and has served as President of the Modernist Studies Association.

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