Frank and Ernest

By Alexandra Day (Artist)
(Green Tiger Press, Hardcover, 9781595834249, 40pp.)

Publication Date: September 2010

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Description

First published in 1988 and now back by popular demand, Good Dog, Carl illustrator Alexandra Day’s Frank and Ernest is the entertaining tale of a bear and an elephant who learn to run a diner.  The charming illustrations of the Deco-era diner and the novelty of its animal employees will appeal to children, but the diner slang that Frank and Ernest learn and use will delight parents and children alike.  Frank and Ernest will reveal the meaning of “burn one, take it through the garden and pin a rose on it,” “a stack with Vermont and a blonde with sand,” as well as “guess water,” “balloon juice,” and “million on a platter.”  As in her popular Carl books Day excels at visual jokes and loving detail, but in Frank and Ernest the text is as delightful as the pictures. 

 

  • In skillfully executed paintings Day depicts a diner that is sure to evoke nostalgia among old-timers.  Children should enjoy adding these novelties to their vocabularies, and making the connections that inspired the descriptions is good fun.  Kirkus Reviews
  • Clever and original, this playful romp serves up its message with a smile.  It’s bound to become standard fare…. School Library Journal
  • Frank, appearing as Elephant, and Ernest, as Bear, answer an ad for someone to run human-shaped Mrs Miller's diner for her.  Bibliophiles that they are, the friends research the lingo of the diner restaurant trade, and with grace and aplomb they serve a "bow-wow. . . red" (hot dog with ketchup), "nervous pudding," (Jell-O"), and "white cow" (vanilla milk shake"). Alexandra Day's paintings render a mannerly world of measured language and punctilious decorum.  Mrs. Miller returns safely from her trip, and we are enveloped in nostalgia--it was all so recent, so very long ago. Peter F. Neumeyer. -  Professor Emeritus University of California, Berkeley.  Author and recipient of the Ann Devereaux Jordan Award by The Children's Literature Association.




About the Author

Alexandra Day and her husband, Harold Darling, established the Green Tiger Press in 1970. In 1983, Harold and Sandra were visiting Zurich, Switzerland, when they came across a volume of old German picture sheets, one of which featured a poodle playing with a baby who was supposed to be taking a nap. This image provided the inspiration for "Good Dog, Carl," which successfully began what would become an increasingly popular picture book series. The Darling's own dog, a Rottweiler named Toby, was the model for the first book's main character. Since then, three other Darling Rottweilers have posed as Carl in the sequels. The Darlings now live in Seattle, Washington, where they have a ten-thousand-book library, primarily filled with illustrated children's books.




Praise For Frank and Ernest

In skillfully executed paintings Day depicts a diner that is sure to evoke nostalgia among old-timers.  Children should enjoy adding these novelties to their vocabularies, and making the connections that inspired the descriptions is good fun.  Kirkus Reviews, 1988

Clever and original, this playful romp serves up its message with a smile.  It’s bound to become standard fare…. School Library Journal, 1988 (starred review)

Frank, appearing as Elephant, and Ernest, as Bear, answer an ad for someone to run human-shaped Mrs Miller's diner for her.  Bibliophiles that they are, the friends research the lingo of the diner restaurant trade, and with grace and aplomb they serve a "bow-wow. . . red" (hot dog with ketchup), "nervous pudding," (Jell-O"), and "white cow" (vanilla milk shake"). Alexandra Day's paintings render a mannerly world of measured language and punctilious decorum.  Mrs. Miller returns safely from her trip, and we are enveloped in nostalgia--it was all so recent, so very long ago. Peter F. Neumeyer. -  Professor Emeritus University of California, Berkeley.  Author and recipient of the Ann Devereaux Jordan Award by The Children's Literature Association.

Praise for Alexandra Day's previous works:

Move over, Mary Poppins - Publisher's Weekly

Day is a master of sweet but not cloying illustration. Her colors are bright and clear; her animals and children expressive and appealing. - School Library Journal

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