Join the Conversation

Join the Conversation

Sign up today to hear about books and authors from an independent bookstore near you.

Report from Planet Midnight

Report from Planet Midnight Cover

Report from Planet Midnight

By Nalo Hopkinson

PM Press, Paperback, 9781604864977, 111pp.

Publication Date: July 17, 2012

Advertisement
Description

Infused with feminist, Afro-Caribbean views of the science fiction and fantasy genres, this collection of offbeat and highly original works takes aim at race and racism in literature. In “Report from Planet Midnight,” at the International Association of the Fantastic in the Arts, an alien addresses the crowd, evaluating Earth's "strange" customs, including the marginalization of works by nonwhite and female writers. “Message in a Bottle” shows Greg, an American Indian artist, befriending a strange four-year-old who seems wise beyond her years. While preparing an exhibition, he discovers that the young girl is a traveler from the future sent to recover art from the distant past—which apparently includes his own work. Concluding the book with series editor Terry Bisson’s Outspoken Interview, Nalo Hopkinson shares laughs, loves, and top-secret Caribbean spells.



About the Author
Nalo Hopkinson is the award-winning author of "Brown Girl in the Ring," "Midnight Robber," "The New Moons Arms," and "The Salt Roads." Her short story collection, "Skin Folk," was the winner of the World Fantasy Award and the Sunburst Award. She is a founding member and current advisory committee member of the Carl Brandon Society, which exists to further the conversation on race and ethnicity in science fiction and fantasy. She lives in Toronto.


Praise For Report from Planet Midnight

“Hopkinson has carved out a fertile niche in the science fiction and fantasy realm.”  —American Library Association

“The plot and style get an early grip on you, the reader, and you don't let go till story's end. Hopkinson is a genuine find!”  —Locus

“Hopkinson has had a remarkable impact on popular fiction. Her work continues to question the very genres she adopts, transforming them from within through her fierce intelligence and her commitment to a radical vision that refuses easy consumption.”  —Globe and Mail

Advertisement