The Double V

How Wars, Protest, and Harry Truman Desegregated America's Military

By Jr. James, Rawn
(Bloomsbury Press, Hardcover, 9781608196081, 304pp.)

Publication Date: January 22, 2013

Other Editions of This Title: Paperback

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Description

Executive Order 9981, issued by President Harry Truman on July 26, 1948, desegregated all branches of the United States military by decree. EO 9981 is often portrayed as a heroic and unexpected move by Truman. But in reality, Truman's history-making order was the culmination of more than 150 years of legal, political, and moral struggle.??

Beginning with the Revolutionary War, African Americans had used military service to do their patriotic duty and to advance the cause of civil rights. The fight for a desegregated military was truly a long war-decades of protest and labor highlighted by bravery on the fields of France, in the skies over Germany, and in the face of deep-seated racism on the military bases at home. Today, the military is one of the most truly diverse institutions in America.

??In The Double V, Rawn James, Jr.the son and grandson of African American veteransexpertly narrates the remarkable history of how the strugge for equality in the military helped give rise to their fight for equality in civilian society. Taking the reader from Crispus Attucks to President Barack Obama, The Double V illuminates the African American military tradition as a metaphor for their unique and dynamic role in American history.




About the Author

A graduate of Yale University and Duke University School of Law, Rawn James, Jr., has practiced law for a decade in Washington, D.C., where he lives with his wife and their children.




Praise For The Double V

“Smart and insightful...an immensely readable book with plenty of modern relevance as today's American military considers who should be able to fight and how… James [is ]an excellent storyteller.”—Christian Science Monitor “As long as inequality persists, this tale of persistence, sacrifice, and triumph will continue to inspire.”—Publishers Weekly

“[James] skillfully examines how the Caucasian-dominated military, with a few notable exceptions in the top ranks, treated African-American members as second-class citizens… An inspiring story spanning parts of five centuries as African-Americans pushed back against the powers that be to achieve more-or-less equal treatment inside the military.”—Kirkus

“An engaging book.”—Library Journal

“Provide[s] important perspective.”—Bookpage

“Well-written, well-researched.”—History Book Club

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