Death of the Liberal Class

Death of the Liberal Class

By Chris Hedges; Arthur Morey (Read by)

Dreamscape Media, Compact Disc, 9781611200003

Publication Date: October 19, 2010

Description

The liberal class plays a vital role in a democracy, and posits itself as the conscience of the nation. It permits us to define ourselves as a good and noble people. Most importantly, the liberal class offers a safety valve for popular frustrations and discontentment by discrediting those who talk of profound structural change. Once this class loses its role, then democracy breaks down and the liberal class becomes an object of ridicule and hatred. The Death of the Liberal Class examines the failure of the liberal class to confront the rise of the corporate state and the consequences of a bankrupt liberalism, making the liberal class irrelevant to society at large and ultimately the corporate power elite they once served.



About the Author
Chris Hedges is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist. He spent nearly two decades as a correspondent in Central America, the Middle East, Africa, and the Balkans, with fifteen years at the New York Times. He is the author of numerous bestselling books, including Empire of Illusion; Death of the Liberal Class; War is a Force that Gives Us Meaning; and Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt, which he co-wrote with Joe Sacco. He writes a weekly column for the online magazine Truthdig. He lives in Princeton, New Jersey.

Arthur Morey has recorded over two hundred audiobooks in history, fiction, science, business, and religion, earning a number of AudioFile Earphones Awards and two Audie Award nominations. His plays and songs have been produced in New York, Chicago, and Milan, where he has also performed.


Praise For Death of the Liberal Class

Starred review. - Library Journal

"Death of the Liberal Class is a book all liberals should read to reassess their own role in American democracy."  - Caroline Cox, Harvard Political Review

"an engaging, powerful and important work that deserves to be widely read and enthusiastically debated." - Ottawa Citizen