Gardens of the Sun

Gardens of the Sun

By Paul McAuley

Pyr, Paperback, 9781616141967, 411pp.

Publication Date: March 2010

The Quiet War is over. The city states of the moons of Jupiter and Saturn, founded by descendants of refugees from Earth's repressive regimes, the Outers, have fallen to the Three Powers Alliance of Greater Brazil, the European Union, and the Pacific Community. A century of enlightenment, rational utopianism and exploration of new ways of being human has fallen dark. Outers are herded into prison camps and forced to collaborate in the systematic plundering of their great archives of scientific and technical knowledge, while Earth's forces loot their cities and settlements and ships, and plan a final solution to the 'Outer problem.'
But Earth's victory is fragile, and riven by vicious internal politics. While seeking out and trying to anatomise the strange gardens abandoned in place by the Outers' greatest genius, Avernus, the gene wizard Sri Hong-Owen is embroiled in the plots and counterplots of the family that employs her. The diplomat Loc Ifrahim soon discovers that profiting from victory isn't as easy as he thought. And on Earth, in Greater Brazil, the democratic traditions preserved and elaborated by the Outers have infected a population eager to escape the tyranny of the great families who rule them.
Meanwhile, in the outer reaches of the Solar System, a rag-taggle group of refugees struggle to preserve the last of the old ideals. And on Triton, fanatical members of a cabal prepare for a final battle that threatens to shatter the future of the human species.
After a conflict fought to contain the expansionist, posthuman ambitions of the Outers, the future is as uncertain as ever. Only one thing is clear. No one can escape the consequences of war -- especially the victors.

About the Author
Paul McAuley was born in England on St George's Day 1955. He has worked as a research biologist in various universities, including Oxford and UCLA, and for six years was a lecturer in botany at St Andrews University. The first short story he ever finished was accepted by the American magazine "Worlds of If", but the magazine folded before publishing it and he took this as a hint to concentrate on an academic career instead. He started writing again during a period as a resident alien in Los Angeles, and is now a full time writer. His first novel, "Four Hundred Billion Stars", won the Philip K. Dick Memorial Award, and fifth, "Fairyland", won the 1995 Arthur C. Clarke and John W. Campbell Awards. His other novels include "Of the Fall", "Eternal Light", "Red Dust", "Pasquale's Angel", the three books of Confluence, "Child of the River", "Ancients of Days", and "Shrine of Stars", "The Secret of Life", "Whole Wide World", and "White Devils". He has also published the collections of short stories" The King of the Hill, The Invisible Country "and "Little Machines". A Doctor Who novella, "The Eye of the Tyger", was published by Telos Books in November 2003, forty years after the author was scared behind the couch by the Daleks. He lives in North London.