The Blood of an Englishman

The Blood of an Englishman

By James McClure

Soho Crime, Paperback, 9781616951061, 316pp.

Publication Date: April 17, 2012


Six days into their search for a man who put a .32-caliber bullet into a South African antique dealer, neither Kramer of the Murder Squad nor his Bantu assistant, Zondi, has a single lead in the case. On the seventh day, Mrs. Digby-Smith opens the trunk of her car and discovers the hideous, tied-up corpse of her younger brother. Two violent crimes—seemingly unconnected. But as Kramer and Zondi pursue their investigation, startling connections turn up in the sordid underworld of Terkkersburg and in the secret, unresolved enmities of World War II.

About the Author
James McClure (1939-2006) was a British author and journalist best known for his Kramer and Zondi mysteries set in South Africa.

Praise For The Blood of an Englishman

Praise for The Blood of an Englishman

“The writing sparkles with the wit and concision of the best traditional mysteries.... McClure was one of the great originals in crime fiction, a defier of categories, and very much worth reading for crime-fiction-lovers of all stripes.”
—Detectives Beyond Borders

Praise for James McClure:
"The pace is fast, the solution ingenious.  Above all, however, is the author’s extraordinary naturalistic style. He is that rarity—a sensitive writer who can carry his point without forcing."
The New York Times Book Review
“More than a good mystery story, which it is, The Steam Pig is also a revealing picture of the hate and sickness of the apartheid society of South Africa.”
Washington Post
“So artfully conceived as to engender cheers.... A memorable mystery.”
Los Angeles Times
“This well-plotted, well-written murder mystery is exceptional ... sometimes grim, sometimes sourly comic, always shocking.”
The Atlantic

"Soho completes its reprinting of one of the finest police series to begin in the 1970s, James McClure's eight books about Tromp Kramer and Mickey Zondi, a South African biracial detective team in the days of Apartheid."
—Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine